- Aircraft History, Specification and Information -
Saab 340

The Saab 340 is a Swedish two-engine turboprop aircraft designed and initially produced by a partnership between Saab and Fairchild Aircraft in a 65:35 ratio. Under the initial plan Saab built the all aluminium fuselage and vertical stabilizer, and also performed final assembly in Linköping, Sweden while Fairchild was responsible for the wings, empennage, and wing-mounted nacelles for the two turboprop engines. After Fairchild ceased this work, production of these parts was shifted to Sweden.

Saab SF340A Corporate Express C-GXPS Photo Taken Penticton Airport BC Canada
Saab SF340A
C-GXPS (sn 340A-075)
Corporate Express
Photo taken April 07, 2007
Penticton Airport, BC Canada
(YYF / CYYF)
Photo © Marcel Siegenthaler

History

Originally designated as the SF340, the aircraft first flew on 25 January 1983. When Fairchild exited the aircraft manufacturing business in 1985 after about 40 units, Saab continued aircraft production under the designation 340A and 159 units were built. An improved version, the second generation 340B, introduced more powerful engines and wider horizontal stabilizers in 1989 and all the 340Bs also had the active noise control system. 200 units were built. The final third generation version, the 340B Plus, was delivered for service in 1994 and incorporated improvements that were being introduced at the same time in the Saab 2000 100 units were built. The production run of Saab 340s typically seated between 30 and 36 passengers, with 34 seats being the most common configuration. The last two 340s built were constructed as older configuration 36-seat aircraft for Japan Air Commuter.

One of the improvements introduced in the 340B Plus was the installation of an active noise and vibration control system in the cabin, reducing noise and vibration levels by about 10 dB during cruising flight. This optional feature carried over from the 340B was standard in the 340B plus along with extended wingtips which was an option on the 340B+. Another change from earlier models was a more modern interior design and the moving of the lavatory compartment from the aft of the passenger cabin to just aft of the flight deck in most 3rd generation units. This increased total available cargo volume as the original location intruded into the cargo bin area. While the active soundproofing became standard on all Saab 340Bs in 1994 the first ever 340B Plus with the extended wingtips was delivered new to Hazelton Airlines in Australia in 1995, later operating for Regional Express, and currently for the Japanese Coast Guard. All 25 3rd generation units that were delivered to American Eagle (now Regional Express) also have the extended wingtips.

The military variants are the Saab 340AEW, 340AEW-200 & 340AEW-300, which are airborne early warning (AEW) and airborne early warning & control (AEW&C) aircraft. Production of all 340 models ended in 1999, and Saab ceased all civil aircraft production in 2005.

Variants

Saab 340A
30 to 36-seat commuter airliner, powered by two 1,630-shp (1215-kW) General-Electric CT7-5A2 turboprop engines. (340A-001 to 340A-159)

Saab 340B
33 to 36-seat commuter airliner, powered by two 1,870-shp (1394-kW) General-Elecric CT7-9B turboprop engines. (340B-160 to 340B-359)

Saab Tp 100
VIP transport version of the Saab 340B and B Plus for the Swedish Air Force.

Saab 340B Plus
Improved version of the Saab 340B. Some units have a wider wingspan. (340B-360 to 340B-459)

Saab 340B plus SAR-200
Maritime search and rescue version for the Japan Coast Guard.

Saab 340AF
Cargo

Saab 340A QC
Quick-chanage freight transport version.

Saab 340AEW / S 100B Argus (FSR-890) Erieye
Airborne early warning version for the Swedish Air Force.

Saab 340AEW-200 / S 100D Argus (IS-340) Erieye

Saab 340AEW-300 / S 100D Argus (ASC-890) Erieye

Operators

As of May 2008, Saab Aircraft AB reports there were 416 Saab 340's in service with 61 operators in 30 countries having accumulated over 13 million flight hours on 14.5 million flights. The workhorse of the fleet (028) with 49,678 hours alone with the Australian unit (016) coming in at second.

Nine SAAB340s have been written off in accidents, 6 of them without fatalities.

Civil operators
The active fleet of current operators
- Air Rarotonga (1)
- Air Åland (3) operated by Alandia Air AB
- Air Panama (2)
- AeroSvit
- AviTrans Nordic (9)
- Avion Express (7)
- Bimini Island Air (2)
- Bridges Worldwide (Solinair) (2)
- CTK Network Aviation (2)
- CTK Network Aviation Mali (1)
- Calm Air (6)
- Caribair (2)
- Carpatair (2)
- Colgan Air (40)
- Corporate Express Airlines (Canada) (1)
- DOT LT (2)
- Estonian Air (2)
- Eznis Airways (3)
- FGI Associates (1)
- Fastlink Egypt (1)
- Fleet Air International (2)
- Golden Air (8)
- Hokkaido Air System (3)
- IBC Airways (5)
- JOB Air, s.r.o (7)
- JMJ Flight Services (1)
- Japan Air Commuter (11)
- Japan Coast Guard (4)
- Kenya Airways (2)
- Lagun Air (2)
- Loganair (16)
- Macair Airlines (7)
- Mali Air Express (2)
- Mars AK (2)
- Mesaba Airlines (49)
- Murray Aviation (1)
- Napelton Aviation Group (1)
- Nationale Regionale Transport (1)
- NextJet (1)
- Norse Air (2)
- Nordic Airways (1)
- OCA Internatioanl (1)
- Overland Airways (1)
- CTK Network Aviation (2)
- Pacific Coastal Airlines (8)
- PenAir (10)
- Pegasus Air Unlimited (1)
- Prince Edward Air (1)
- Provincial Airlines (2)
- RAF-AVIA Airlines (2)
- Regional Express Airlines (REX) (41)
- Ryjet (1)
- Robin Hood Aviation (2)
- Sol Líneas Aéreas (3)
- Saint-Ex Cargo (3)
- SkyTaxi (2)
- SkyBahamas Airlines (3)
- South Airlines (2)
- SprintAir (9)
- Swedish Air Force (9)
- Tiara Air (2 On order)
- Transportes Aereos Guatemaltecos (1)
- Transwest Air (3)
- Vigo Jet (1)
- Western Air (1)
- Wingo (1)
- Tango/Fly Lappeenranta (1)operated by Central Connect Airline

Regional Express Airlines has committed to lease 25 Saab 340B+ aircraft in the largest lease deal for the type, which has a redesigned extended wing to increase flight performance and fuel efficiency. They should enter service over the next three to four years. With the delivery of these 340B+'s. The Saab 340A's and some older 340B's will be phased out, 3 of the 340A's will be converted into freighters. First Delivery was in May 2007. As of September 2008, 15 have been delivered. These B+ aircraft, all formerly in service with American Eagle, will all be delivered in 2009.

Former operators

- Adria Airways (Slovenia)- cargo
- Aer Lingus (Ireland)
- Air Nelson (New Zealand)
- Amber Air (Lithuania)
- Argentina
- Andesmar
- United States
- American Eagle Airlines
- Business Express
- Castle Aviation
- Chicago Express
- Comair
- Crossair (Switzerland, launch customer)
- Dauair (Germany)
- Direct Fly (Poland)
- FlyLAL (Lithuania)
- Estonian Air (Estonia)
- Express Airlines I/Pinnacle Airlines
- Finncomm Airlines (Finland)
- Finnaviation (Finland)
- Hazelton Airlines (Australia)
- Indiana State University Foundation (USA)
- Kaiken Lineas Aereas (Argentina)
- Kendell Airlines (Australia)
- KLM Cityhopper (Netherlands)
- LAPA (Argentina)
- LAER (Argentina)
- Moldavian Airlines (Moldova)
- Nordic Solutions Air
- OLT Ostfriesische Lufttransport (Germany)
- Quebec Air Express (Canada)
- RAF-Avia (Latvia) - cargo
- RegionsAir (USA)
- Shuttle America (USA)
- Sky Express (Greece)
- Sky Taxi (Poland)
- Vildanden (airline) (Norway)

Military operators

- Sweden Swedish Air Force
- Thailand Royal Thai Air Force
- Argentina Argentine Air Force
- Ecuador Ecuadorian Air Force
- Pakistan Pakistan Air Force

Specifications (Saab 340B and Saab 340B+)

General characteristics
- Crew: 2 pilots, 1 flight attendant
- Capacity: 30, 33, 34 or 36 passengers
- Length: 19.73 m (64 ft 9 in)
- Wingspan: 21.44 m (70 ft 4 in)
- Height: 6.97 m (22 ft 11 in)
- Wing area: 41.8 m² (450 sq ft)
- Airfoil: NASA MS(1)-0316 / -0312 (root/tip)
- Empty weight: 8140 kg (17,945 lb)
- Loaded weight: 13,155 kg ()
- Powerplant: 2× General Electric CT7-9B turboprops, 1295 kW (1,730 shp or 1850 shp with APR= 107% Trq) each
- Cargo Max. C1: 1300 lb C2*: 800 lb (*Limited by Mesaba & American Eagle Airlines)
- Propellers: Dowty Rotol or Hamilton Standard 14RF19 four-blade constant speed (diameter 3.35 m (11 ft))
- Fuel capacity: 2580 kg (5,690 lb)
- Max. Gross Weight: 13,630 kg (29,000 lb)
- Max. Landing Weight: 12,900 kg (28,500 lb)
- Cabin Length: 10.4 m (34 ft 1 in)
- Cabin Width: 2.2 m (7 ft 1 in)
- Headroom: 1.8 m (6 ft 0 in)
- Aisle Width: 0.4 m (16.3 in)
- Max. Cabin Pressure Differential: 7.1 psi Auto/7.5 psi Max

Performance
- Maximum speed: 523 km/h (282 kt)
- Cruise speed: 467 km/h,250 kt
- Range: 1730 km (935 nm)
- Service ceiling 25,000 ft (commercial) / 31,000 ft (executive configuration) (7,600 m / 9,400 m)

Last updated February 14, 2009
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Saab 340".
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