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  Aircraft History, Specification and Information
Douglas DC-3
 
Douglas DC-3C - C-GWZS - Buffalo Joe - Buffalo Airways
1942 Douglas DC-3C - C-GWZS (sn 12327)
Bufallo Airways - Joe McBryan "Buffalo Joe" in front of C-GWZS after Piloting the late afternoon flight from Yellowknife to Hay River.
Photo taken Aug. 28, 2015
Hay River, NT - Canada (YHY / CYHY)
Photo © AirplaneMart.com

The Douglas DC-3 is a fixed-wing propeller-driven airliner. Its cruise speed (207 mph or 333 km/h) and range (1,500 mi or 2,400 km) revolutionized air transport in the 1930s and 1940s. Its lasting effect on the airline industry and World War II makes it one of the most significant transport aircraft ever made.

The DC-3 was a twin engine metal monoplane, developed as a larger, improved 14 bed sleeper version of the Douglas DC-2. It had many exceptional qualities compared to previous aircraft. It was fast, had a good range and could operate from short runways. It was also reliable, easy to maintain and carried passengers in greater comfort. Before the war it pioneered many air travel routes. It was able to cross the continental United States, making transcontinental flights and worldwide flights possible, and is considered to be the first airliner that could make money by carrying passengers alone.

Civil DC-3 production ended in 1942 with only 607 aircraft being produced. However, together with its military derivative, the C-47 Skytrain (designated the Dakota in RAF Service), and with Russian and Japanese built versions, over 16,000 were built. Following the Second World War, the airliner market was flooded with surplus C-47s and other transport aircraft and attempts to produce an upgraded super DC-3 were a failure.

While the DC-3 was soon made redundant on main routes by more advanced types such as the Douglas DC-6 and Lockheed Constellation, the design continued to prove exceptionally adaptable and useful. Large numbers continued to see service in a wide variety of niche roles well into the 21st century. Approximately 400 DC-3s and converted C-47s are still flying to this day as a testament to the durability of the design, many examples being over 70 years old. There is speculation that the DC-3 may become the first airliner to see over a century of operation.

Design and development

CF-OOY / C-FOOY
1944 Douglas C47A Dakota (DC-3) - CF-OOY (sn 12411)
Kenting Atlas Aviation
Photo taken Jan. 28, 2012
CF-OOY located 45nm North-East of Iqaluit (CYFB) where it ran out of fuel and (crash) landed Nov. 3, 1975
Photo © Marcel Siegenthaler
CF-VQV / C-FFAY / CF-JWP
CF-VQV / C-FFAY / CF-JWP
Photo taken Aug. 29, 2015
Red Deer, AB - Canada (YQF / CYQF)
Photo © Marcel Siegenthaler
CF-VQV
Douglas DC-3 (R) DST-A-207C
Douglas Sleeper Transport
CF-VQV (sn 3264)
Photo taken Aug. 29, 2015
Red Deer, AB - Canada (YQF / CYQF)
Photo © Marcel Siegenthaler
C-FFAY
Douglas DC-3C
C-FFAY (sn 4785)
Photo taken Aug. 29, 2015
Red Deer, AB - Canada (YQF / CYQF
Photo © Marcel Siegenthaler
C-FJWP
Douglas DC-3C
C-FJWP (sn 9089) Gateway Aviation
Photo taken Aug. 29, 2015
Red Deer, AB - Canada (YQF / CYQF
Photo © Marcel Siegenthaler
Douglas DC-3A N600NA
1941 Douglas DC-3A - N600NA (sn 3291)
Photo taken Nov. 6, 2010
New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport, FL - USA (EVB / KEVB)
Photo © AirplaneMart.com

The designation "DC" stands for "Douglas Commercial". The DC-3 was the culmination of a development effort that began after an inquiry from Transcontinental and Western Airlines (TWA) to Donald Douglas. TWA's rival in transcontinental air service, United Airlines, was starting service with the Boeing 247 and Boeing refused to sell any 247s to other airlines until United's order for 60 aircraft had been filled. TWA asked Douglas to design and build an aircraft to allow TWA to compete with United. Douglas' design, the 1933 DC-1, was promising, and led to the DC-2 in 1934. The DC-2 was a success, but there was room for improvement.

The DC-3 resulted from a marathon telephone call from American Airlines CEO C. R. Smith to Donald Douglas, when Smith persuaded a reluctant Douglas to design a sleeper aircraft based on the DC-2 to replace American's Curtiss Condor II biplanes. (The DC-2's cabin was 66 inches (1.7 m) wide, too narrow for side-by-side berths.) Douglas agreed to go ahead with development only after Smith informed him of American's intention to purchase twenty aircraft. The new aircraft was engineered by a team led by chief engineer Arthur E. Raymond over the next two years, and the prototype DST (for Douglas Sleeper Transport) first flew on December 17, 1935 (the 32nd anniversary of the Wright Brothers' flight at Kitty Hawk). Its cabin was 92 in (2.3 m) wide, and a version with 21 seats instead of the 14-16 sleeping berths of the DST was given the designation DC-3. There was no prototype DC-3; the first DC-3 built followed seven DSTs off the production line and was delivered to American Airlines.

The DC-3 and DST popularized air travel in the United States. Eastbound transcontinental flights could cross the U.S. in about 15 hours with three refueling stops; westbound trips against the wind took 171⁄2 hours. A few years earlier such a trip entailed short hops in slower and shorter-range aircraft during the day, coupled with train travel overnight.

A variety of radial engines were available for the DC-3. Early-production civilian aircraft used Wright R-1820 Cyclone 9s, but later aircraft (and most military versions) used the Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp, which gave better high-altitude and single engine performance. Three DC-3S Super DC-3s with Pratt & Whitney R-2000 Twin Wasps were built in the late 1940s.

Production

Total production of all variants was 16,079. More than 400 remained in commercial service in 1998. Production was as follows:

  • 607 civil variants of the DC-3.
  • 10,048 military C-47 and C-53 derivatives were built at Santa Monica, California, Long Beach, California, and Oklahoma City.
  • 4,937 were built under license in the Soviet Union as the Lisunov Li-2 (NATO reporting name: Cab).
  • 487 Mitsubishi Kinsei-engined aircraft were built by Showa and Nakajima in Japan, as the L2D Type 0 transport (Allied codename Tabby).

Production of civil DC-3s ended in 1942. Military versions were produced until the end of the war in 1945. A larger, more powerful Super DC-3 was launched in 1949 to positive reviews.The civilian market, however, was flooded with second-hand C-47s, many of which were converted to passenger and cargo versions. Only three Super DC-3s were built and delivered for commercial use the following year. The prototype Super DC-3 served the U.S. Navy with the designation YC-129 alongside 100 R4Ds that had been upgraded to the Super DC-3 specification.

Turboprop conversions

From the early 1950s, some DC-3s were modified to use Rolls-Royce Dart engines, as in the Conroy Turbo Three. Other conversions featured Armstrong Siddeley Mamba and Pratt & Whitney PT6A turbines.

The Greenwich Aircraft Corp DC-3-TP is a conversion with an extended fuselage and with Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-65AR or PT6A-67R engines fitted.

The Basler BT-67 is a conversion of the DC-3/C-47. Basler refurbishes C-47s and DC-3s at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, fitting them with Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-67R turboprop engines, lengthening the fuselage by 40 in (100 cm) with a fuselage plug ahead of the wing and strengthening the airframe in selected areas.

BSAS International in South Africa is another company able to perform a Pratt & Whitney PT6 turboprop conversion of DC-3s. Over 50 DC-3/C-47s / 65ARTP / 67RTP / 67FTPs have been modified.

Conroy Aircraft also made a three-engined conversion with Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6 called the Conroy Tri-Turbo-Three.

Operational history

American Airlines inaugurated passenger service on June 26, 1936, with simultaneous flights from Newark, N.J. and Chicago, IL. Early U.S. airlines like American, United, TWA and Eastern ordered over 400 DC-3s. These fleets paved the way for the modern American air travel industry, quickly replacing trains as the favored means of long-distance travel across the United States. A nonprofit group, Flagship Detroit Foundation, continues to operate the only original American Airlines Flagship DC-3 with air show and airport visits throughout the U.S.

In 1936, KLM Royal Dutch Airlines received its first DC-3 (in 1943 it was downed by Luftwaffe fighters while on a scheduled passenger flight), which replaced the DC-2 in service from Amsterdam via Batavia (now Jakarta) to Sydney, by far the longest scheduled route in the world at the time. In total KLM bought 23 DC-3s before the war broke out in Europe.

In 1941, a China National Aviation Corporation (CNAC) DC-3 pressed into wartime transportation service was bombed on the ground at Suifu airfield in China, completely destroying the right wing. The only spare wing available was that of a smaller Douglas DC-2 being overhauled in CNAC's workshops. The DC-2's right wing was taken off, flown to Suifu under the belly of another CNAC DC-3, and grafted to the damaged aircraft. After a single test flight, in which it was discovered that it pulled to the right due to the difference in wing sizes, the so-called DC-21⁄2 went back into service.

Cubana de Aviación became the first Latin American airline to offer a scheduled service to Miami when it started its first scheduled international service from Havana to Miami in 1945 with a DC-3. Cubana used DC-3s on some domestic routes well into the 1960s.

Piedmont Airlines operated DC-3s and C-47s from 1948 to 1963. A DC-3 painted in the representative markings of Piedmont, operated by the Carolinas Aviation Museum, was retired from flight in March 2011. Both Delta Air Lines and Continental Airlines once operated commemorative DC-3s wearing period markings.

During World War II, many civilian DC-3s were drafted for the war effort and just over 10,000 U.S. military versions of the DC-3 were built, under the designations C-47, C-53, R4D, and Dakota. Peak production was reached in 1944, with 4,853 being delivered. The armed forces of many countries used the DC-3 and its military variants for the transport of troops, cargo, and wounded.

Licensed copies of the DC-3 were built in Japan as the Showa L2D (487 aircraft); and in the Soviet Union as the Lisunov Li-2 (4,937 aircraft).

Thousands of surplus C-47s, previously operated by several air forces, were converted for civilian use after the war and became the standard equipment of almost all the world's airlines, remaining in frontline service for many years. The ready availability of cheap, easily maintained ex-military C-47s, both large and fast by the standards of the day, jumpstarted the worldwide postwar air transport industry. While aviation in prewar Continental Europe had used the metric system, the overwhelming dominance of C-47s and other U.S. war-surplus types cemented the use of nautical miles, knots and feet in postwar aviation throughout the world.

Douglas developed an improved version, the Super DC-3, with more engine power, greater cargo capacity and a different wing, but with all the bargain-priced surplus aircraft available, they did not sell well in the civil aviation market. Only five were delivered, three of them to Capital Airlines. The U.S. Navy had 100 of its early R4Ds converted to Super DC-3 standard during the early 1950s as the R4D-8, later C-117D. The last U.S. Navy C-117 was retired July 12, 1976. The last U.S. Marine Corps C-117, serial 50835, was retired from active service during June 1982. Several remained in service with small airlines in North and South America in 2006.

A number of aircraft companies attempted to design a "DC-3 replacement" over the next three decades (including the very successful Fokker F27 Friendship), but no single type could match the versatility, rugged reliability and economy of the DC-3. It remained a significant part of air transport systems well into the 1970s.

Douglas DC-3 today

Perhaps unique among prewar aircraft, the DC-3 is in daily use. There are still small operators with DC-3s in revenue service and as cargo aircraft. The common saying among aviation buffs and pilots is that "the only replacement for a DC-3 is another DC-3". The aircraft's legendary ruggedness is enshrined in the lighthearted description of the DC-3 as "a collection of parts flying in loose formation." Its ability to take off and land on grass or dirt runways makes it popular in developing countries, where runways are not always paved.

Current uses of the DC-3 include aerial spraying, freight transport, passenger service, military transport, missionary flying, skydiver shuttling and sightseeing.

The very large number of civil and military operators of the DC-3/C-47s and related types, means that a listing of all the airlines, air forces and other current operators is impractical. As of 2012, DC-3 #10 is still used daily for flights in Colombia. Buffalo Airways, based in Canada's Northwest Territories, operates a scheduled DC-3 passenger service between its main base in Yellowknife and Hay River, plus some passenger charter operations, using DC-3s. Some DC-3s are also used by the airline for cargo operations.

The oldest surviving DST is N133D, the sixth Douglas Sleeper Transport built in 1936. This aircraft was delivered to American Airlines on July 12, 1936 as NC16005. The aircraft is at Shell Creek Airport (F13), Punta Gorda, Florida, where it is undergoing restoration. The aircraft will be restored back to Douglas Sleeper Transport standards, and full airworthiness.

The oldest DC-3 still flying is the original American Airlines Flagship Detroit (c/n 1920, #34 off the Santa Monica production line) which can be seen at airshows around the United States and is owned and operated by the nonprofit Flagship Detroit Foundation.

The base price of a new DC-3 in 1936 was around $60–80,000, and by 1960, used examples were available for $75,000.

A 1943 DC-3 was installed as a major design element atop architectural renovations at The Roasterie in Kansas City, Missouri.

Original DC-3 operators

The List of Douglas DC-3 operators lists only the original customers who purchased new aircraft.

With the availability of large numbers of surplus military C-47 Skytrain or Dakotas after the Second World nearly every airline and military force in the 1940s and 1950s operated the aircraft at some point. At the end of the 20th century and into the 21st century the Douglas DC-3 is still in commercial operation.

Commercial operators

  • Australia
    Airlines of Australia
    Australian National Airways (ANA)
  • Belgium
    Sabena
  • Czechoslovakia
    Československa Letecka Spolecnost (ČLS)
  • Ireland
    Aer Lingus
  • Netherlands
    KLM
  • Peru
    PANAGRA
  • Romania
    LARES
  • Sweden
    AB Aerotransport
  • Switzerland
    Swissair
  • United States
    American Airlines
    Braniff Airways
    Capital Airlines - the only purchaser of the DC-3S Super DC-3 post-war variant
    Chicago and Southern Air Lines
    Colonial Airlines
    Delta Air Lines
    Eastern Air Lines
    Northwest Airlines
    Pan American World Airways
    Pennsylvania Central Airlines
    Transcontinental & Western Air
    United Airlines
    Western Air Express
  • Venezuela
    Línea Aeropostal Venezolana (LAV)

Military operators

  • United States
    United States Army Air Corps/United States Army Air Forces - Includes aircraft built for the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army Air Force but taken over before delivery following the Japanese occupation of the Dutch East Indies
    United States Navy

Variants

  • DST
    Douglas Sleeper Transport, the initial variant with two Wright R-1820 Cyclone , standard sleeper accommodation for up to 16 with small upper windows,convertible to carry up to 24 day passengers . Type Certificate ATC607. DST-A similar sleeper version with Pratt & Whitney R-1830 engines , ATC647
  • DC-3
    Derived from DST with 21 day passenger seats , Wright R-1820 Cyclone engines,no sleeper berths, no upper windows. Type Certificate ATC618
  • DC-3A
    As DC-3 but with two 1,200 hp (895 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830-21 radial piston engines. Type Certificate ATC619
  • DC-3B
    Version of DC-3 with two Wright R-1820 Cyclone engines for TWA, smaller convertible sleeper cabin forward with fewer upper windows than DST. Type Certificate ATC635
  • DC-3C
    Designation for ex-military C-47, C-53 and R4D aircraft rebuilt by Douglas Aircraft in 1946, given new manufacturers numbers and sold on the civil market, Pratt & Whitney R-1830 engines. Type Certificate ATC669
  • DC-3D
    Designation for 28 new aircraft completed by Douglas in 1946 with unused components from the cancelled USAAF C-117 production line.Pratt & Whitney R-1830 engines. Type Certificate ATC669
  • DC-3S
    Super DC-3, substantially redesigned DC-3 with fuselage stretched by one frame, a new shape outer wings and distinctive tall squared tail, and fitted with two higher powered Wright R-1820 Cyclone or Pratt & Whitney R-2000 engines . Five completed by Douglas for civil use using existing surplus secondhand airframes. Three Super DC-3s were operated by Capital Airlines 1950-1952. Designation also used for examples of the 100 R4Ds that had been converted by Douglas to this standard for the U.S. Navy as R4D-8s (later designated C-117Ds), all fitted with higher poweredWright R-1820 Cyclone engines , some of which entered civil use after retirement from the military.
  • LXD1
    A single DC-3 supplied for evaluation by the Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service.
  • C-41,C-41A
    The Douglas C-41 was a single VIP DC-3 derivative(serial 38-502) supplied against order AC11137 for the narrower DC-2 derived C-39s,but powered by two 1,200 hp (895 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830-21 radial piston engines. (serial 38-502), for use by Air Corps Chief Westover (later used by Hap Arnold).
    The Douglas C-41A was a single VIP DC-3A (serial 40-070) supplied September 1939, powered by two 1,200 hp (895 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1830-21 radial piston engines, used to fly the Secretary of War The forward cabin converted to sleeper configuration with upper windows similar to the DC-3B .
  • C-48
    One former United Air Lines DC-3A impressed.
  • C-48A
    Three impressed DC-3As with 18-seat interiors.
  • C-48B
    Sixteen impressed former United Air Lines DST-As with 16-berth interior used as air ambulances.
  • C-48C
    Sixteen impressed DC-3As with 21-seat interiors.
  • C-49
    Various DC-3 and DST models, 138 impressed into service as C-49, C-49A, C-49B, C-49C, C-49D, C-49E, C-49F, C-49G, C-49H, C-49J, and C-49K.
  • C-50
    Various DC-3 models, 14 impressed as C-50, C-50A, C-50B, C-50C and C-50D.
  • C-51
    One aircraft ordered by Canadian Colonial Airlines impressed into service, had starboard-side door.
  • C-52
    DC-3A aircraft with R-1830 engines, five impressed as C-52, C-52A, C-52B, C-52C and C-52D.
  • C-68
    Two DC-3As impressed with 21-seat interiors.
  • C-84
    One impressed DC-3B aircraft.
  • R4D-2
    Two Eastern Air Lines DC-3s impressed into USN service as VIP transports, later designated R4D-2F and later R4D-2Z.
  • R4D-4
    Ten impressed DC-3s for the US Navy
  • R4D-4R
    Seven impressed DC-3s as staff transports for the US Navy.
  • R4D-4Q
    Radar countermeasures version of R4D-4 for the US Navy.
  • Dakota II
    RAF designation for impressed DC-3s
  • Conversions
  • Airtech DC-3/2000
    DC-3/C-47 engine conversion done by Airtech Canada, first offered in 1987. Powered by two PZL ASz-62IT radial engines.
  • Basler BT-67
    DC-3/C-47 conversion with a stretched fuselage, strengthened structure, modern avionics, and powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PT-6A-67R.
  • BSAS C-47TP Turbo Dakota
    A South African C-47 conversion for the South African Air Force by Braddick Specialised Air Services, with two Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-65R turboprop engines, revised systems, stretched fuselage and modern avionics
  • Conroy Turbo Three
    One DC-3/C-47 converted by Conroy Aircraft with two Rolls-Royce Dart Mk. 510 turboprop engines.
  • Conroy Super-Turbo-Three
    Same as the Turbo Three but converted from a Super DC-3. One converted.
  • Conroy Tri-Turbo-Three
    One DC-3/C-47 converted by Conroy Aircraft with three Pratt & Whitney Canada PT-6A turboprops.
  • Greenwich Aircraft Corp Turbo Dakota DC-3
    DC-3/C-47 conversion with a stretched fuselage, strengthened wing center section and updated systems; and powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-65AR turboprop engines
  • Ts-62
    Douglas-built airframe fitted with Russian Shvetsov ASh-62IR radial engines after World War II due to shortage of American engines in the Soviet Union
  • Ts-82
    Similar to Ts-62, but with Shvetsov ASh-82FN radial engines of 1,650 hp
  • USAC DC-3 Turbo Express
    A turboprop conversion by the United States Aircraft Corporation, fitting Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-45R turboprop engines with an extended forward fuselage to maintain center of gravity. First flight of the prototype conversion, (N300TX), was on July 29, 1982.

Military and foreign derivatives

  • Douglas C-47
    Production military DC-3A variant.
  • Showa/Nakajima L2D
    487 License built DC-3s and derivatives for the IJNAS.
  • Lisunov Li-2 / PS-84
    4,937 DC-3 derivatives license-built in the USSR.

List of accidents and incidents involving the DC-3 since 2000

This list includes aircraft based on the DC-3 airframe such as the Douglas C-47 Skytrain and Lisunov Li-2. Military accidents, hijackings and incidents of terrorism are covered.

2000

  • 17 March
    Canada Douglas DC-3C C-FNTF of Points North Air Services crashed at Ennadai Lake Airport while attempting a go-around. Both crew died, the cause was found to be that the aircraft's centre of gravity was too far to the rear, possibly due to the cargo shifting in flight. Both crew members were found to have high levels of carboxyhaemoglobin in their blood. The flight had departed from Points North Landing Airport, Points North Landing, Saskatchewan.
  • 20 July
    The Bahamas Douglas C-47A N54AA of Allied Air Freight suffered an engine failure on take-off from Grand Bahama International Airport, Freeport on a cargo flight to Nassau International Airport, Bahamas. The aircraft crashed while attempting to return to Grand Bahama and was destroyed. Both crew died.
  • 2 September
    Colombia Basler BT-67 FAC1659 of the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana was destroyed when it flew into the 11,200 feet (3,400 m) high Mount Montezuma; all seven on board died.
  • 9 November
    El Salvador Basler BT-67 FAS119 of the Fuerza Aérea Salvadoreña was damaged beyond economic repair on landing at Los Comandos Airport, Los Comandos. The aircraft suffered brake failure, overran the runway and collided with a tree.

2001

  • 23 January
    United States Douglas DC-3C N19454 of Majestic Air Cargo was destroyed when it flew into Table Top Mountain at an altitude of 1,500 feet (460 m) while on a flight from Unalaska Airport to Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska. Investigation revealed that no flight plan had been filed, which delayed the reporting of the aircraft as overdue. Both crew members tested positive for drugs - the captain for cocaine and the first officer for amitriptyline and nortriptyline.
  • 25 January
    Venezuela RUTACA Airlines Flight 225, operated by Douglas DC-3C YV-224-C, crashed at Ciudad Bolívar; all 24 on board plus one person on the ground died. Another person on the ground was seriously injured. There were unconfirmed reports that a 25th person may have been on board the aircraft. The aircraft was on a non-scheduled domestic passenger flight from Tomás de Heres Airport, Ciudad Bolivar to Del Caribe "Santiago Mariño" International Airport, Porlamar and had developed an engine problem shortly after take-off.
  • 15 March
    United States Douglas C-47A N842MB of Jim Hankins Air Service made a successful emergency landing at Donalsonville Municipal Airport, Donalsonville, Georgia following an inflight engine failure, fire and separation of the starboard engine. The aircraft was on a cargo flight from Panama City-Bay County International Airport, Panama City, Florida to Southwest Georgia Regional Airport, Albany, Georgia, it was assessed as damaged beyond economic repair. The aircraft was transported to the Museum of Aviation, Warner Robins, Georgia in August 2005.
  • 4 April
    Puerto Rico Douglas DC-3A N19BA of Roblex Aviation ditched in the sea off Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport, Carolina, Puerto Rico after suffering a double engine failure while on a local training flight. Both crew escaped. Damage to the aircraft was described as minor.
  • 9 July
    United States Douglas C-47A N3239T of the Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Space Coast Regional Airport, Titusville, Florida. The aircraft was returning from an air show at Pope Air Force Base, Fayetteville, North Carolina and had made a refuelling stop at Moore County Airport, Southern Pines, North Carolina. The aircraft was later repaired and returned to service.
  • December
    Democratic Republic of the Congo Air Katanga Douglas C-53 ZS-OJD was written off in a landing accident at Lubumbashi International Airport after a delivery flight that originated in South Africa.

2002

  • 21 May
    United States Douglas DC-3A XB-JBR of Aero JBR ditched in Lake Casa Blanca, Texas after a double engine failure while performing a touch-and-go at Laredo International Airport. It is reported that one of the engines suffered a propeller overspeed condition. All three crew escaped from the submerged aircraft.

2003

  • 10 March
    Sudan Aero Modifications International (AMI) DC-3-65TPA ZS-MFY of Rossair Contracts was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Rumbek Airport due to encountering windshear. The aircraft was repaired, and flown out on 17 April 2003.
  • 19 March
    United States Aerotaxi Flight 882 operated by Douglas DC-3C CU-T1192 was hijacked on a flight from Rafael Cabrera Airport, Nueva Gerona, Cuba to José Martí International Airport, Havana, Cuba. The aircraft landed at Key West International Airport, Key West, Florida, where the six hijackers were detained.
  • 30 April
    Colombia Basler BT-67 PNC-0212 of the Servicio Aéreo de Policía was damaged beyond repair when it overran the runway at Aguas Claras Airport, Ocaña.
  • 2 October
    Colombia A Douglas DC-3 operating an illegal flight for the Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia was destroyed by the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana at Bocas del Rosario.
  • 21 November
    South Africa Douglas C-47A ZS-BXF, operating South African Air Force Historic Flight Flight 668, was substantially damaged in a forced landing after both engines failed shortly after take-off from Lanseria International Airport, Johannesburg, due to fuel mismanagement. The aircraft's destination was AFB Swartkop, Centurion. Repairs were carried out at OR Tambo International Airport, Kempton Park, Gauteng. The restored aircraft flew out on 10 November 2006.
  • 30 December
    United States Virgin Islands Douglas DC-3C N781T of Tol-Air Services was substantially damaged when the starboard undercarriage collapsed on landing at Cyril E. King Airport, Charlotte Amalie after a flight that originated at San Juan, Puerto Rico.

2004

  • March
    Guatemala Fuerza Aérea Guatemalteca Basler BT-67 FAG-580 was written off when it overshot a runway on landing at an unknown location.
  • 20 June
    Colombia Douglas C-49J HK-1212 of Viarco suffered an engine fire on take-off from Las Gaviatos Airport, Las Gaviatos and crashed into trees. The aircraft was on a non-scheduled domestic passenger flight to German Olano Airport, Puerto Carreño. All 20 on board escaped.
  • 26 June
    Russia Lisunov Li-2T RA-1300K of FLA RF crashed at Zaozerye shortly after take-off from Myachkovo Airport, Moscow and was destroyed. The aircraft was operating a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight to Grabtsevo Airport, Kaluga. Two of the five people on board died.
  • 23 July
    El Salvador Fuerza Aérea Salvadoreña Basler BT-67 FAS117 was substantially damaged when the undercarriage collapsed on landing at El Jaguey.
  • 13 August
    United States Douglas DC-3 N22RB was written off at Orlando-Herndon Airport, Orlando, Florida during Hurricane Charley when it was blown onto its back and smashed against a hangar.
  • 15 October
    Colombia Douglas DC-3C HK-1504 of AeroVanguardia flew into an electricity line and crashed near Medellín on approach to Enrique Olaya Herrera Airport while performing a domestic cargo flight from La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio to José María Córdova International Airport, Medellín. The flight had been diverted from its intended destination due to fog. The three crew died.
  • 17 December
    Colombia Douglas DC-3 HK-2663 of Arall Columbia was substantially damaged when it overran the runway at Puerto Gaitán Airport, Puerto Gaitán. The aircraft was on a domestic scheduled passenger flight from Barrancominas Airport to La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio when the starboard engine started vibrating and a diversion was made. Although substantially damaged, the aircraft was subsequently repaired and returned to service.

2005

  • 6 June
    Colombia Douglas DC-3A HK-3462 of Transportes Aéreos del Ariari crashed near Miraflores shortly after take-off from Miraflores Airport when an engine caught fire. The aircraft was on a chartered domestic passenger flight to Jorge Enrique González Torres Airport, San José del Guaviare.
  • 13 June
    United States Douglas R4D-8 N3906J of Air Pony Express suffered an engine failure shortly after take-off from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, Fort Lauderdale, Florida on an international cargo flight to Marsh Harbour Airport, Marsh Harbour, Bahamas. The aircraft was written off when it was put down on a street in the Coral Ridge Isles residential neighbourhood of Fort Lauderdale, hitting trees, parked cars and a building and subsequently catching fire. The engine that failed had had maintenance work performed immediately before the accident flight.
  • 19 June
    Democratic Republic of the Congo Douglas C-47B 9Q-CWI of Wimbi Dira Airways was damaged beyond repair when it suffered a groundloop on landing at Kabalo Airport, Kabalo. The aircraft ended up in a minefield and the wreckage remains in situ.
  • 24 October
    United States Douglas C-53 N7500A was substantially damaged at Opa-locka Airport, Florida during Hurricane Wilma.

2006

  • 19 July
    United States Virgin Islands Douglas DC-3C N782T of Tol-Air Services ditched into the sea off Charlotte Amalie after an engine failure shortly after take-off from Cyril E. King Airport. All four people on board escaped as the aircraft floated for about ten minutes before sinking. The aircraft now lies in 100 feet (30 m) of water and is a dive site.

2007

  • 25 May
    Colombia Douglas DC-3C HK-3199 of AeroVanguardia was substantially damaged when it departed the runway at Acaricuara Airport, Acaricuara on landing after a flight from Jorge Enrique González Torres Airport, San José del Guaviare. The aircraft was repaired and returned to service.
  • 31 July
    Colombia Douglas DC-3C HK-1149 of AeroVanguardia was substantially damaged when a forced landing was made in a rice field at Puerto Concordia. The aircraft was on a scheduled domestic passenger flight from Jorge Enrique González Torres Airport, an José del Guaviare to La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio when an engine failed.
  • 20 December
    Antarctica Basler BT-67 C-FMKB of Kenn Borek Air was substantially damaged in a take-off accident at Mount Patterson when the take-off was attempted with insufficient speed for flight. Of the 12 people on board, only the co-pilot suffered minor injuries. Although both sets of undercarriage collapsed and the port wing was damaged, the aircraft was later repaired and returned to service.

2008

  • 24 January
    Colombia Douglas DC-3C HK-2006 of Viarco was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Teresita Airport, Teresita. The aircraft was operating a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Jorge Enrique González Torres Airport, San José del Guaviare. All 13 passengers and crew escaped, the aircraft was subsequently repaired and returned to service.

2009

  • 4 January
    Antarctica Basler BT-67 C-GEAJ of Antarctic Logistics Centre International crashed on landing at Tony Camp (74°04′56″S 10°54′28″E) after a flight from Novolazarevskaya Station.
  • 4 February
    United States Douglas DC-3-65/ARA N834TP of the National Test Pilot School was substantially damaged in a take-off accident at Mojave Air and Space Port, Mojave, California. Both sets of undercarriage and the port engine were ripped off. The aircraft was on a local training flight. The accident was caused by an incorrectly set rudder trim.
  • 18 February
    Colombia Basler BT-67 FAC1670 of the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana crashed near Captain Germán Olano Moreno Air Base, Palanquero on a local training flight. All five crew died.
  • 18 February
    Colombia Basler BT-67 PNC-0211 of the Servicio Aéreo de Policia was destroyed by the accidental detonation of a number of hand grenades at Enrique Olaya Herrera Airport, Medellín. Eight people were injured, four seriously. The aircraft was due to fly 25 police officers to El Caraño Airport, Quibdó.
  • 26 April
    Puerto Rico Douglas DC-3C N136FS of Four Star Air Cargo was destroyed when a fire broke out in the cockpit at Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport, Carolina. The aircraft was taxiing for take-off on a mail flight to Cyril E. King Airport, Charlotte Amalie, United States Virgin Islands.
  • 17 October
    Philippines Douglas C-47D RP-C550 of Victoria Air crashed after take-off from Ninoy Aquino International Airport, Manila and was destroyed; all four crew on board died. The aircraft was operating a cargo flight to Puerto Princesa International Airport, Puerto Princesa City. Amongst the cargo were six drums of aviation fuel. An intense fire broke out which destroyed the aircraft. Twenty-two houses were destroyed by fire.

2010

  • 19 June
    Germany Douglas DC-3C D-CXXX of Berlin Air Services crashed on take-off from Berlin Schönefeld Airport on a local sightseeing flight. Eight of the 25 passengers and crew were injured, the aircraft was substantially damaged.
  • 13 August
    Netherlands Douglas C-47 44-76787 (USAF serial) was substantially damaged when it became jammed under a bridge on the A4 motorway at Leiden. The aircraft was being transported by road from the Wings of Liberation Museum, Schijndel to Valkenburg Naval Air Base, where it was to be used as a prop in a musical based on the film Soldaat van Oranje about Erik Hazelhoff Roelfzema.
  • 6 November
    Colombia Douglas DC-3C HK-4700 of LASER Aéro Colombia was substantially damaged after its brakes failed during landing at Guerima Airport in Colombia; the aircraft was on a domestic cargo flight from Villavicencio. During the landing roll the hydraulic system lost pressure after the hose to the starboard main landing gear brake assembly failed; the pilot shut down both engines but lost control while trying to steer the aircraft without brakes; and it swerved off the runway and into a ditch, seriously damaging the starboard wing.

2012

  • 5 December
    South Africa A South African Air Force C-47TP of 35 Squadron SAAF went missing in bad weather conditions en route from Waterkloof Air Force base in Pretoria to Qunu in the Eastern Cape. The wreckage was later found in Giant's Castle during search and rescue operations, in the Drakensberg in KwaZulu-Natal. All 11 passengers and crew members on board died.
  • 20 December
    Antarctica Basler BT-67 C-GEAI of Kenn Borek Air was substantially damaged while attempting to take off from a glacier at Holtanna Peak. It lifted off prematurely after the aircraft's wheels hit a snowbank during its takeoff roll. The aircraft stalled at a low level and it hit the ground, tearing off the landing gear. Of the 15 passengers and two crew on board, two received slight injuries, the others were uninjured.

2013

  • 19 August
    Canada Buffalo Airways Flight 168, operated by Douglas DC-3C C-GWIR suffered an engine fire on take off from Yellowknife Airport for Hay River Airport. The aircraft was substantially damaged when it made a wheels-up landing short of Runway 10. There were no injuries amongst the 21 passengers and three crew.

2014

  • 8 May
    Colombia Douglas DC-3C HK-4700 of ALIANSA Colombia was destroyed in crash in mountainous terrain in Colombia while en route on a domestic cargo flight from Villavicencio to Florencia, Caquetá. All five passengers and crew were killed. The same aircraft had been damaged in a landing accident three-and-a-half years earlier, on 6 November 2010.

1999 and before

  • On 10 November 1999, Douglas DC-3C HK-2581 of Aliansa crashed at La Montañita while on an international cargo flight from Putumayo Airport, Puerto El Carmen de Putumayo, Ecquador to La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio. All five people on board were killed. The aircraft had probably been struck by a surface to air missile.
  • On 30 August 1999, Douglas C-117D RP-C473 of Mabuhay Airlines crashed into power lines at Santa Rosa while on a ferry flight from Fernando Air Base, Lipa City to Ninoy Aquino International Airport, Manila. All nine people on board survived.
  • On 18 March 1999, Douglas DC-3C HK-337 of Aliansa crashed 10 kilometres (5.4 nmi) from Tame on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Camilo Daza International Airport to El Alcaraván Airport, Yopal. All eight people on board were killed.
  • On 13 January 1999, Douglas DC-3C C-GWUG of Kelowna Flightcraft Air Charter crashed into Mount Parke, Mayne Island while on a domestic cargo flight from Vancouver Intenational Airport to Victoria Intenational Airport. Investigation revealed that the flight was being operated under Visual Flight Rules at night, in contravention of Canadian Aviation Regulations.
  • On 1 November 1998, Douglas C-47A N3FY of Living Water Teaching Ministries crashed into a mountain near Quetzaltenango on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Playa Grande Airport to Quetzaltenango Airport. Eleven of the 18 people on board were killed.
  • On 2 October 1998, Douglas DC-3C YV-611C of Servivensa crashed on approach to Canaima Airport. The aircraft had been on a local sightseeing flight to view the Angel Falls. One of the 25 people on board was killed.
  • On 24 August 1998, AMI DC-3-65TP ZS-NKK of Speed Service Couriers crashed on take-off from Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria. The aircraft had been in maintenance and the elevator trim had been left in the full nose-up position. The pilot failed to carry out pre-flight checks and did not notice the position of the trim tab. One of the two crew was killed. The aircraft was on a mail flight to Durban International Airport.
  • On 24 May 1998, Douglas C-47A N67588 of Majestic Air Cargo was damaged beyond repair in a landing accident at Point MacKenzie, Alaska following fuel exhaustion on a ferry flight from Unalakleet Airport to Anchorage International Airport.
  • On 3 February 1998, Douglas C-47A N200MF of Missionary Flights International crashed on approach to George Town Airport. The aircraft was on a passenger flight from Cap-Haitien International Airport, Haiti when an engine failed shortly after take-off. The crew decided to return to George Town but the second engind failed on approach. All 26 on board survived.
  • On 2 February 1998, Douglas C-117D N505C was damaged beyond repair by a tornado at Opa-locka Airport, Florida.
  • On 20 December 1997, Douglas C-47 XA-CUC of Aerolineas California Pacifico crashed near Guerrero Negro on a flight from Guerrero Negro Airport to Isla de Cedros Airport, Cedros, Baja California.
  • On 7 November 1997, Douglas C-47A N59316 of McNeeley Charter was damaged beyond repair at West Memphis, Arkansas when a wheels-up landing was made on a sandbank in the Mississippi River. The aircraft was on a ferry flight from Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport to West Memphis Municipal Airport when both engines failed due to fuel exhaustion.
  • On 15 April 1997, a Douglas DC-3 was hijacked at N'djili Airport, Kinshasa. There were six to eight hijackers.
  • On 15 March 1997, Basler BT-67 TZ-389 of the Force Aérienne de la République du Mali crashed at Newton, Wisconsin after being involved in a mid-air collision with Beechcraft A36 Bonanza N3657A. The aircraft was on a ferry flight from Wittman Regional Airport Oshkosh to Manitowoc County Airport and the Bonanza was engaged in aerial photography. Both crew on board the BT-67 were killed, as were all four people on board the Bonanza.
  • On 9 December 1996, Douglas C-47A N75142 of Emery Worldwide crashed on approach to Boise Airport killing both crew. The aircraft was on a cargo flight to Salt Lake City International Airport when the starboard engine caught fire shortly after take-off and the decision was made to return to Boise.
  • On 31 October 1996, Douglas DC-3C N37AP of Flamenco Airways crashed at San Juan. The aircraft was on a cargo flight from Isla Grande Airport to Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport when a problem developed with the starboard engine. The propellor feathering system was known to be inoperative, although this was not recorded in maintenance logs. The increased drag from the unfeathered propellor was such that it overcame the power available from the functioning engine.
  • On 25 September 1996, Douglas DC-3C PH-DDA of the Dutch Dakota Association crashed on mudflats in the Waddensee 8 nautical miles (15 km) north of Den Oever following an engine failure on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Texel International Airport to Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. The propellor failed to feather and created excessive drag. All 32 people on board were killed. Additional factors in the accident were the crew's lack of proficiency in dealing with emergency situations and a lack of a simulator to practice handling emergencies.
  • On 20 June 1996, Douglas DC-3A N23WT of Loren Davis Ministries International was destroyed in a crash at Cut and Shoot, Texas. The aircraft was on a training flight based at Conroe Airport when an engine failure occurred. The co-pilot did not hear the call to feather the propellor on the affected engine. The aircraft flew into a tree, hit power lines and was destroyed in the subsequent fire. A witness stated that the aircraft was lifted off with insufficient airspeed. The crew also attempted to fly the aircraft at an incorrect airspeed following the engine failure.
  • On 5 May 1996, Douglas DC-3C C-GCZG of Aviation Boreal was damaged beyond repair when the undercarriage collapsed in a landing accident on the frozen surface of Kenty Lake, Quebec.
  • On 30 March 1996, Douglas C-47B HK-2497 of LANC Colombia was damaged beyond repair in a wheels-up landing on approach to La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio. The aircraft was on a domestic scheduled passenger flight to Lamacarena Airport when an engine problem was encountered and the decision was made to return to La Vanguardia.
  • On 21 August 1995, a Douglas DC-3 which had been converted to turboprop engines was written off at Lobito Airport.
  • On 19 August 1995, Douglas C-47B C-GZOF of Air North crashed on approach to Vancouver International Airport, Richmond, British Columbia killing one of the three crew. The aircraft was on a ferry flight to Prince Rupert Airport when the starboard propellor went into overspeed and the decision was made to return to Vancouver International.
  • On 19 July 1995, Douglas C-47A N54AN was destroyed in a crash near Independence, New York following an engine failure and the pilot shutting down the wrong engine. The aircraft was on a ferry flight from Elmira Regional Airport to Kansas City Downtown Airport. One of the two crew was killed.
  • On 18 July 1995, Douglas C-47A 5R-MMG of the Armée de l'Air Malgache crashed on approach to Maintinaro Airport. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Ivato Airport, Antananarivo. Of the 40 people on board, 34 were killed.
  • On 25 May 1995, Douglas DC-3C HK-3213 of LACOL Colombia crashed on approach to Miraflores Airport on a flight from La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio. The cargo aircraft was carrying 11 passengers, two of whom were killed.
  • On 12 March 1995, Douglas C-47B C-FDTT of Transfair was written off in a landing accident at Lac Manitou Airport, Quebec.
  • On 17 December 1994, Douglas C-47A YV-761-C of Servivensa crashed on approach to Cerro Aicha Airport killing all nine people on board.
  • On 15 December 1994, Basler BT-67 N96BF of SL Aviation Services was damaged beyond repair in a take-off accident at Lobito Airport when flight was attempted with insufficient airspeed. Both crew were killed.
  • On 24 November 1994, Douglas C-47B FAP2028 of Transportes Aéreo Militar - TAM Paraguay was damaged beyond repair when it overran the runway on take-off at Puerto la Victoria Airport on a cargo flight to Silvio Pettirossi International Airport.
  • On 26 September 1994, Douglas C-47D FAP2009 of Transportes Aéreo Militar - TAM Paraguay was written off in a take-off accident at Bahia Negra Airport while on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight to Silvio Pettirossi International Airport, Luque. The pilot was killed when a propellor blade entered the cockpit but the other 28 passengers and crew survived.
  • On 1 August 1994, Douglas C-47A 6041 of Türk Hava Kuvvetleri was written off in an accident at Eskişehir Airport.
  • On 26 June 1994, Douglas C-47A C-FROD of Buffalo Airways crashed on approach to Fort Simpson Airport, Northwest Territories due to fuel exhaustion. The aircraft was on a cargo flight from Trout Lake Airport.
  • On 28 May 1994, Douglas C-53D HK-2213 of Transoriente Colombia crashed near Villavicencio after both engines failed shortly after take-off from La Vanguardia Airport on a scheduled passenger flight. Seven of the 29 people on board were killed.
  • On 24 April 1994, Douglas DC-3 VH-EDC of South Pacific Airmotive, chartered to carry the cadet pipe band of The Scots College to an ANZAC Day ceremony on Norfolk Island, suffered power loss in the left engine on take-off from Sydney International Airport and ditched in Botany Bay. All 21 passengers and four crew on board were rescued by private watercraft operating on the bay, with the flight attendant suffering serious injuries; the aircraft was subsequently written-off. Investigators found that the cause was a combination of poor maintenance, an overloaded aircraft and improper handling during the take-off and subsequent emergency.
  • On 18 March 1994, Douglas DC-3C N3433Y of Salair crashed shortly after take-off from Spokane International Airport on a cargo flight to Portland International Airport. The starboard engine failed shortly after take-off. The engine that failed had previously been in long-term storage and had been fitted to the aircraft on 21 February, replacing an engine that developed a misfire and loss of power. It had accumulated 15 hrs flight time at the time of the accident. The aircraft was destroyed in the subsequent fire and both crew were killed.
  • On 22 November 1993, Douglas C-47A C9-STE of Scan Transportes Aéreos crashed near Molima while on a cargo flight. Two of the three crew were killed.
  • On 7 November 1993, AMI DC-3-65TP ZS-KCV of Professional Aviation Services was damaged beyond repair in a take-off accident at Lokichogio Airport.
  • On 31 August 1993, Douglas R4D-5 HK-3220 of Transoriente Colombia crashed into the Río Guaviare and was written off.
  • On 20 April 1993, Douglas C-47A CP-1622 of Trans Aéreos Cochabamba was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Gustavo Artunduaga Paredes Airport, Florencia. The port engine failed and both crew were killed in the accident.
  • On 20 April 1993, Douglas C-47B N8056 of Phoenix Air was written off in a wheels-up landing at Zephyrhills, Florida following an engine failure while engaged in a flight in support of parachuting operations from Zephyrhills Municipal Airport. An investigation by the NTSB found that the aircraft should have been able to climb on one engine. The pilot's type rating for the DC-3 was suspended following the accident with the requirement that he should pass a Federal Aviation Authority proficiency check before it was restored.
  • On 8 March 1993, Douglas C-47A EC-FAH of ARM crashed on take-off from Palma de Mallorca Airport on a cargo flight to Madrid-Barajas Airport. Both crew were killed.
  • On 18 February 1993, a Douglas DC-3C of Missionary Flights International was hijacked on a flight from Cap-Haitien International Airport, Haiti to Palm Beach County Park Airport, Florida, United States. The hijacker surrendered after the aircraft landed.
  • On 14 January 1993, Douglas C-47A C-FAAM of Central Mountain Air Services crashed shortly after take-off from Bronson Creek Airport, British Colombia on a flight to Wrangell Airport, Wrangell, Alaska. Both crew were killed.
  • On 2 November 1992, Douglas C-47A CP-1960 of Transportes Aereos San Jorge crashed short of the runway at San Juan after an engine failed whilst on a test flight.
  • On 31 August 1992, Aero Modifications International (AMI) DC-3-65TP ZS-DHX of Professional Aviation Services crashed on take-off from Jamba Airport, Jamba on an international non-scheduled passenger flight to Wonderboom Airport, Pretoria. All three crew were killed, but the 17 passengers escaped.
  • On 21 July 1992, Douglas DC-3C LX-DKT of Legend Air was damaged beyond repair at Oostende Airport when it was blown into Boeing 707 Z-WKV during a storm. As of 15 June 2008, the aircraft was still at Oostende.
  • In February 1992, Douglas DC-3C 5Y-BBN of Air Kenya was written off at an airstrip in the Masai Mara. The aircraft was scrapped in situ in 1993.
  • On 29 February 1992, Douglas DC-3A CP-529 of Frigorifico Santa Rita was destroyed by a fire at Carolita Ranch.
  • On 21 January 1992, Douglas VC-47D L2-41/15/210 of the Royal Thai Air Force was damaged beyond repair in a landing accident at Don Mueang International Airport, Bangkok.
  • On 27 December 1991, Hellenic Air Force Douglas C-47B KK171 was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Tatoi Air Base, Dekeleia. One of the six crew was killed.
  • On 22 December 1991, Douglas DC-3A D-CCCC of Classic Wings crashed at Handschuhsheim, Heidelberg while on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight that had departed from Frankfurt Airport. Twenty-eight of the 32 people on board were killed.
  • On 25 November 1991, Douglas C-47B C9-STD of Scan Transportes Aéreos crashed into trees while performing an overshoot at Sena-Sofala while on a cargo flight from Beira Airport. One crew member was killed.
  • On 7 June 1991, Douglas DC-3 N102AP of Victoria Air was written off near Gregorio Luperó International Airport, San Felipe de Puerto Plata, following a double engine failure on approach. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Arroyo Barril International Airport, Samaná.
  • On 15 May 1991, Douglas C-47B HK-3177 of Aerolineas del Este crashed at La Poyatta killing 13 of the 14 people on board. The aircraft was on a non-scheduled passenger flight from La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio to Miraflores Airport, Miraflores, Guaviare. The passengers were told to jettison the cargo but in doing so they affected the centre of gravity of the aircraft and the pilot lost control.
  • On 10 May 1991, Douglas R4D-7 N134FS of Four Star Air Cargo was damaged beyond repair when it crashed shortly after take-off from Rafael Hernández Airport, Aguadilla following an engine failure and stall. Both crew were killed. The aircraft was on a cargo flight to Mercedita Airport, Ponce.
  • On 4 April 1991, Douglas C-47B C-FQNF of Central Mountain Air Services crashed on the frozen surface of Thutade Lake, British Colombia, killing six of the seven occupants. The aircraft was on a passenger flight from Sturdee Airport to Smithers Airport.
  • On 4 January 1991, Douglas DC-3 EC-EQH of Aeromarket Express overran the runway at Palma de Mallorca Airport on a cargo flight to Menorca Airport and was damaged beyond repair.
  • On 4 December 1990, a Douglas C-47 of the Fuerza Aérea Salvadoreña was shot down by a SA-14 missile, crashing near Chalate. All five people on board were killed.
  • On 19 October 1990, Douglas C-47B CP-735 of Bolivian Air Flight International crashed in the Andes on a cargo flight from Bella Vista to El Alto International Airport, La Paz, killing all four people on board. The wreckage was not discovered for six years.
  • On 24 July 1990, Douglas C-47A RP-C140 of Victoria Air was damaged beyond repair in a forced landing at San Juan after the starboard engine developed a vibration.
  • On 19 May 1990, Douglas C-53D N1FN operated by K & K Aircraft crashed at Capon Bridge, West Virginia after hitting power lines while engaged in crop spraying. Both crew were killed.
  • On 28 April 1990, Douglas C-47A RP-C81 of Manila Aero Transport System (MATS) crashed shortly after take-off from Ninoy Aquino International Airport on a non-scheduled domestic passenger flight to Roxas Airport following an engine failure. MATS did not have a licence to fly passengers. Seven of the 22 passengers were killed. The aircraft had earlier made a forced landing on a taxiway at Manila.
  • On 18 March 1990, Douglas DC-3A HR-SAZ of SAHSA overran the runway on landing at Juan Manuel Gálvez International Airport, Roatán and ended up in the sea. The aircraft, performing a domestic scheduled passenger service, was damaged beyond repair but all 32 people on board escaped.
  • On 19 November 1989, Douglas DC-3C RP-C14 of Victoria Air Inc. ditched 100 metres (110 yd) off Barualite. The aircraft was on a scheduled passenger flight at the time. All five people on board survived.
  • On 17 September 1989, Douglas C-47A N100DW of Tol Air Services was damaged beyond economic repair at Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport, Carolina by Hurricane Hugo.
  • On 17 September 1989, Douglas DC-3 N4425N, Douglas C-47s N100SD, N4471J and N4577Z; and Douglas C-49J N28346 of Aero Virgin Islands; along with Douglas C-47A N101AP of Four Star Air Cargo; were damaged beyond economic repair at Cyril E. King Airport, Charlotte Amalie by Hurricane Hugo.
  • On 26 June 1989, Douglas C-47A N8042X of California Air Tours ditched 5 miles (8.0 km) off Petersburg, Alaska following the loss of fabric from an aileron and the breaking of the chain connecting the left control wheel to the aileron control system; and the pilots' subsequent incorrect assessment of the degree of controllability of the aircraft. The aircraft was on a ferry flight from Petersburg Municipal Airport to Ketchikan International Airport. On 6 July 1989 the aircraft was salvaged with the intention of returning it to airworthiness, but this was not carried out. In 2000, the hulk was reported to have been sold for restoration and placement on a pedestal at Juneau International Airport. As of 2005, the hulk was still at Petersburg.
  • On 22 May 1989, Douglas C-47A N47CE of Condor Enterprise crashed at Waterman, Illinois, 5 miles (8.0 km) from DeKalb Airport, Illinois whilst on a training flight from Sugar Grove Airport to Chicago Rockford International Airport. All three crew were killed.
  • On 21 May 1989, Douglas C-47A C-GWYX of Central Mountain Air Services made a forced landing at Bronson Creek following an in-flight engine fire. The aircraft was subsequently destroyed by fire but both crew escaped. The aircraft was on an international cargo flight from Wrangell Airport, Alaska to Bronson Creek Airport.
  • On 6 May 1989, Douglas C-47A RP-C82 of MATS crashed on take-off from Manila International Airport following an engine failure. The aircraft was being used on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight although it was not licenced to carry passengers. All 18 people on board survived.
  • On 2 May 1989, Douglas C-47A N28889 of Monroe County Mosquito Control District crashed at Summerland Key, Florida after striking mangrove trees whilst spraying. The aircraft was operating out of Marathon Flight Strip at the time. Both crew were killed.
  • On 1 March 1989, Douglas C-49J N28PR of Borinquen Air ditched on approach to Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport, Carolina following a failure of the port engine. Although the landing gear was retracted, the crew did not feather the propellor. This resulted in increased drag which made flight impossible. The aircraft was on an international cargo flight from Golden Rock Airport, Saint Kitts and Nevis.
  • On 28 February 1989, Douglas C-47A C-FBZN of Transfair crashed near Quebec. The aircraft was on a cargo flight destined to land at Lac Bienville.
  • On 18 January 1989, Douglas DC-3 XB-DYP crashed shortly after take-off from Laredo International Airport, Texas. The aircraft was on an international cargo flight to Torreón International Airport, Mexico. The cause of the accident was that the cargo was improperly secured and shifted in flight, causing the centre of gravity to move aft.
  • On 17 January 1989, Douglas C-47A CP-1418 of Aerolineas La Paz crashed near La Paz whilst on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from El Alto International Airport to Apolo Airport. All five people on board were killed.
  • On 1 November 1988, Douglas C-47A C-FBJE of Air Ontario crashed into Pikangikum Lake on a domestic cargo flight from Red Lake Airport to Pikangikum Airport. Two of the three people on board were killed.
  • On 20 September 1988, Douglas C-47A Z-WRJ of Crest Breeders crashed shortly after take-off from Harare International Airport following a loss of power from the starboard engine. The aircraft was on a cargo flight, all three crew survived.
  • On 29 August 1988, Douglas AC-47 FAC-1650, of the 214th Tactical Squadron, Fuerza Aérea Colombiana was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident.
  • On 2 May 1988, Douglas C-47A ET-AGT of Ethiopian Airways was destroyed on the ground at Axum Airport in an attack on the airport by Ethiopian Air Force MiG-23s.
  • On 21 April 1988, Douglas C-47A N47FE of African Air Carriers was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at Quelimane Airport. Both crew were killed, one other person on board was seriously injured. The aircraft may have been shot down.
  • On 12 April 1988, Douglas DC-3C ZS-UAS of United Air suffered an in flight fire and crashed at Hennenman, Orange Free State killing all 24 people on board. The aircraft was on a domestic scheduled passenger flight from Bloemfontein Airport to Johannesburg International Airport.
  • On 8 February 1988, Douglas AC-47 L2-34/13 of the Royal Thai Air Force was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Dong Muang AFB. The aircraft was subsequently preserved at Don Mueang International Airport.
  • In 1987, Douglas C-47B FAP-2034 of TAM Paraguay crashed at Lagerenza.
  • In 1987, a Douglas C-47B of the Fuerza Aérea Paraguaya was written off in an accident at Bahia Negra Airport.
  • On 8 December 1987, Douglas DC-3 CP-1059 of TASMI was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at San Ignacio Airfield, San Ignacio de Moxos.
  • On 18 November 1987, Douglas C-47B P2-006 of the Papua New Guinea Defence Force was damaged beyond economic repair in an emergency landing shortly after take-off from Lae Nadzab Airport. An engine had lost power and a wing was ripped off in the subsequent belly landing. The wreck was taken to Lae Airfield for stripping of useful parts. The hulk remained at Lae Airfield into the early 1990s.
  • On 20 September 1987, Douglas C-47 6843 of the South African Air Force was destroyed in a forced landing near Bloemfontein following an engine fire. All three people on board survived.
  • On 15 August 1987, Douglas DC-3 5Y-DAK of Sunbird Aviation crashed on approach to Kilaguni Airport. All 28 people on board survived.
  • On 28 July 1987, Douglas C-53 N39DT of La Mesa Leasing Inc was damaged beyond economic repair when the port engine failed shortly after take-off from Laredo International Airport, Texas on an international cargo flight to Ciudad Camargo Airport, Mexico. The aircraft was overloaded by 3,809 pounds (1,728 kg) and the power from the remaining good engine was insufficient to sustain flight. The aircraft stalled and crashed whilst attempting to make an emergency landing back at Laredo. Both crew survivied. A post-accident investigation revealed no problems with the failed engine.
  • On 13 July 1987, Douglas DC-3 N28364 of KDD Aviation was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Ciudad Camargo Airport, Camargo, Tamaulipas. One person was killed.
  • On 28 May 1987, A Douglas C-47 of the Fuerza Aérea Hondureña was written off. All twelve people on board were killed.
  • On 11 May 1987, Douglas C-47B C-FADD of Air Manitoba crashed near Pickle Lake, Ontario after a structural failure of the port wing. The aircraft was on a domestic cargo flight from Big Trout Lake Airport to Pickle Lake Airport. Both crew were killed.
  • On 10 March 1987, Douglas C-47A N49454 of Aero Express was shot down by a Dassault Mystère IV of the Fuerza Aérea Hondureña whilst on an illegal flight and using the false callsign HK-313. All three people on board were killed when the aircraft crashed near Palamital.
  • On 9 March 1987, Douglas DC-3 N78B of the International Flight Center crashed in Venezuela whilst being used on an illegal flight involving smuggling. All three people on board were killed.
  • In October 1986, Douglas C-47B A65-114 of the Aircraft Research and Development Unit RAAF crashed-landed following the failure of both engines immediately after taking off from RAAF Base Edinburgh. After the aircraft touched down back on the runway the left landing gear collapsed, damaging the fuselage. The Dakota never flew again and was donated to the South Australian Aviation Museum, Port Adelaide in 1992, where it remains on display.
  • On 28 August 1986, a Douglas C-47 of the Fuerza Aérea Sandinista crashed near Siuma. The aircraft may have been shot down, both crew were killed.
  • On 29 July 1986, Douglas C-53D N27PR of Borinquen Air crashed into a lagoon on approach to Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport, Carolina. The aircraft was on an international cargo flight to Golden Rock Airport, Saint Kitts and Nevis when the starboard engine failed shortly after take-off and the decision was made to return to Carolina. One of the two crew was killed, the other was seriously injured.
  • On 10 July 1986, Douglas C-47A 7315 of the Zimbabwe Air Force crashed on take-off from Maputo International Airport. All 17 people on board were killed.
  • On 24 May 1986, a Douglas C-47 of the Madagascar Air Force crashed into a mountain near Antananarivo in poor weather. All 13 people on board were killed.
  • On 8 February 1986, Douglas DC-3 HK-3031 of SAEP Colombia crashed on approach to El Dorado International Airport, Bogotá. The port engine had lost power shortly after take-off on a cargo flight to Rondon Airport and the decision was made to return to Bogotá. Although the aircraft was destroyed in the post-impact fire, all five people on board survived.
  • On 29 January 1986, Douglas DC-3A XA-IOR of Aero California crashed at Las Lomitas when attempting to divert to Las Lomitas Airport. The aircraft was on a domestic scheduled passenger flight from Villa Constitución Airport, Ciudad Constitución to Los Mochis Airport. All 21 people on board were killed.
  • On 19 January 1986, Douglas C-47A C-GNNA of Austin Airways struck a 150 feet (46 m) high Non-directional beacon tower and crashed at Sachigo Lake Airport, Ontario.
  • On 31 December 1985, Douglas DC-3C N711Y of Century Equipment crashed at De Kalb, Texas following an inflight fire. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight between Guntersville Municipal Airport and Dallas Love Field when a fire broke out in the cabin. Both crew were seriously injured and all seven passengers were killed, including singer Ricky Nelson.
  • On 25 December 1985, Douglas C-47 YV-425C of AeroEjecutivos ditched off Cumana following a double engine failure.
  • On 10 September 1985, a Douglas DC-3 of Collier County Mosquito Control District crashed at East Naples, Florida whilst on approach to Naples Municipal Airport following an engine failure. The aircraft was on agricultural duties at the time.
  • On 30 June 1985, Douglas C-47B N168Z of Northern Peninsula Fisheries was substantially damaged at King Salmon, Alaska when both engines failed on approach to King Salmon Airport whilst the aircraft was on an executive flight from Homer Airport, Alaska. The cause of the accident was fuel exhaustion. A fuel filler cap was discovered to be missing after the accident. In March 2000, the aircraft was recorded in a derelict condition at El Mirage, California.
  • On 6 June 1985, Douglas C-53D HK-1340 of LACOL Colombia crashed shortly after take-off from La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio after the starboard engine failed while the aircraft was on a cargo flight. The aircraft was probably overloaded and it caught fire after crashing into trees. Three of the six people on board were killed.
  • On 4 May 1985, Douglas DC-3C N157U of Perris Valley Paracenter was damaged beyond economic repair when the port engine lost a propellor blade on take-off from Perris Valley Airport, causing the engine to be torn from its mountings. There were no injuries amongst the two crew and 31 parachutists on board. A mandatory Airworthiness Directive had been issued concerning the propellor, but an investigation found no evidence that it had been complied with.
  • On 18 December 1984, a Douglas C-47 of the Royal Thai Navy crashed on take-off from Songkhla Airport and was destroyed by fire.
  • In November 1984, Douglas C-47A F-BYCU of Stellair crashed near Tangier following fuel exhaustion.
  • On 22 November 1984, Douglas C-47A N2204S of Factury Buying Corporation crashed at Salinas Victoria.
  • On 31 October 1984, Douglas C-47B RP-C138 of Village Airways went missing on a domestic cargo flight from Davao International Airport to Manila International Airport. There were four people on board.
  • On 22 September 1984, Douglas C-47A L2-4/90/680 of the Royal Thai Air Force was damaged beyond repair when it departed the runway on landing at Surin Airport after a tyre burst.
  • On 27 August 1984, a Douglas C-47 of the Fuerza Aérea Nicaragua was shot down near Quilali by forces of the Sandinista National Liberation Front. All ten people on board were killed.
  • On 15 August 1984, Douglas C-47A PK-OBC of Airfast Indonesia crashed into a mountain near Wamena. Two of the three people on board were killed.
  • On 11 August 1984, Douglas C-47 N70003 of Aviation Enterprises crashed shortly after take-off from Memphis International Airport on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight to O'Hare International Airport, Chicago. All three people on board were killed. A missing spark plug on the port engine caused a loss of power. Maintenance involving the removal of the spark plugs had been performed the previous day.
  • On 19 April 1984, Douglas C-47 TI-SAA of Servicios Aéreos Nacionales crashed into Mount Irazu, killing all four people on board.
  • On 16 January 1984, Douglas C-47 9Q-CYD of Transport Aérien Zairois departed the runway at Kissidougou Airport following an engine failure on take-off. Dry grass was set on fire when it came into contact with the hot engine and the aircraft was subsequently destroyed by fire. All seventeen people on board escaped uninjured. The aircraft was operating a non-scheduled passenger flight in support of the Dakar Rally.
  • On 9 January 1984, Douglas C-47B C-GSCA of Skycraft Air Transport crashed on take-off from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport on an international cargo flight to Toronto Pearson International Airport, Canada. Both engines lost power shortly after take-off. It was discovered that the engines failed due to detonation after the aircraft was fuelled with jet fuel instead of avgas. One of the two crew members was killed.
  • During 1983, Douglas DC-3 N401JB of Swift Delivery Air Freight was damaged beyond repair in a storm at an airfield in Honolulu, Hawaii.
  • On 13 December 1983, Douglas C-47B RP-C287 of Philair crashed shortly after take-off from Manila International Airport following an engine failure. The aircraft was on a non-scheduled passenger flight. All ten people on board survived.
  • On 31 October 1983, Douglas DC-3C N44896 of FBN Flying Service was destroyed by fire at Laredo International Airport, Texas while attempting to take-off on a cargo flight to McAllen-Miller International Airport, Texas. A fire had developed on board the aircraft during the take-off run, and the crew were unable to extinguish it with the equipment availale to them.
  • On 9 August 1983, Douglas VC-47B L2-30/07/641 of the Royal Thai Air Force crashed on take-off from Ubon Ratchathani AFB on a military flight. All five people on board were killed, along with four on the ground.
  • On 19 July 1983, Douglas C-47A N480F of Chevron Oil crashed shortly after take-off from Khartoum International Airport on a non-scheduled passenger flight. Both engines had failed, probably due to contaminated fuel. All 27 people on board survived.
  • On 22 June 1983, Douglas C-47A C-GUBT of Skycraft Air Transport crashed on approach to Toronto International Airport while on an international cargo flight from Cleveland-Hopkins International Airport, Ohio. Both crew were killed.
  • On 3 May 1983, Douglas C-47B FAC-1126 of SATENA was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Palmaseca Airport, Cali.
  • On 18 March 1983, Douglas C-47E FAP-356 of the Fuerza Aérea del Perú was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Arequipa Airport.
  • On 15 February 1983, Douglas DC-3 C-FBKX of Ontario Central Airlines was damaged beyond repair in a forced landing at Shamathawa, New Brunswick. The overloaded aircraft was unable to maintain flight following an engine failure while on a non-scheduled passenger flight; all four people on board survived. As of July 2009, the hulk of the aircraft remains on site at 55°58.18′N 92°31.65′W.
  • On 16 January 1983, Douglas DC-3 TG-SAB was damaged beyond repair when it crash-landed on a beach at Bay City, Texas. The aircraft was being used to smuggle marijuana when it struck the beach, resulting in a propellor being torn off.
  • During 1982, Douglas C-47B RP-C3 of Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (the central bank of the Philippines) was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Manila International Airport.
  • On 12 December 1982, Douglas C-47A HK-2580 of Transportes Aéreas Latinamericas crashed at Santiago Vila Airport, Girardot while on a training flight destined to land at Mariquita Airport. One of the four people on board was killed.
  • On 5 December 1982, privately-owned Douglas C-53 N163E was damaged beyond repair in a taxiing accident at Hollywood-Burbank Airport, California. The fuselage was later used as a restaurant at Las Vegas, Nevada.
  • On 12 October 1982, Douglas C-47A ZS-EJK of Comair was written off when it crashed into a mountain near Graskop, 36 nautical miles (67 km) from Hoedspruit when attempting to divert to that airport whilst flying in instrument meteorological conditions. All 30 people on board survived.
  • On 27 September 1982, Douglas C-47 G-AKNB of Harvest Air was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident at Blackpool Airport, Lancashire. The aircraft was later sold to the United States and re-registered N95NA. As of July 1995, it was stored at Plattsburgh International Airport, New York. The aircraft was subsequently restored to flying condition, and as of October 2007 was with BGA Aviation, Bennettsville, South Carolina, United States as N459NA.
  • On 15 September 1982, a Douglas C-47 (c/n 6108, formerly registered VH-SBO), stored in the open at Bankstown Airport in Sydney, was damaged when the pilot of a light aircraft committed suicide by deliberately crashing it nearby. The C-47 was never repaired and was subsequently transferred to the airport fire dump.
  • On 22 August 1982, Douglas DC-3 ET-AHP of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond repair in a take-off accident at Alula Aba Airport.
  • On 20 July 1982, Douglas C-47D N102BL of Pronto Aviation Services was damaged beyond repair in a crash landing near El Paso International Airport, Texas following an engine failure shortly after take-off. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight to Tucson International Airport, Arizona when the engine failed and the decision was made to return to El Paso. A single engine go-around was attempted following an unsafe landing gear warning.
  • On 6 June 1982, Douglas C-47A N95C of Fromhagen Aviation was written off when the starboard engine failed on take-off from St. Petersburg-Clearwater International Airport, Florida on a training flight. All five people on board survived.
  • On 7 May 1982, Douglas C-47A C-FQHF of Kenn Borek Air overran the runway at Calgary International Airport following an aborted take-off. The aircraft was damaged beyond economic repair. The aircraft was subsequently purchased by Buffalo Airways and moved to Hay River, North West Territories for use as a spares source.
  • On 9 February 1982, Douglas C-47A RP-C141 of Trans Air Services flew into Mount Ipao, Panay Island on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Manila International Airport to Sicogon Airport, Carles. Both crew and one of the 32 passengers were killed.
  • On 21 January 1982, Douglas DC-3A N211TA of Tursair was substantially damaged in an accident at Opa-locka Airport, Florida. The aircraft was on a training flight and the trainee pilot mishandled the engine controls, causing a temporary loss of power. The aircraft ran off the runway and collided with a tree. Inadequate supervision and the failure of the student pilot to relinquish control of the aircraft to the instructor were cited as contributing to the accident.
  • Early in 1981, Douglas C-47B 5N-ARA of Arax Airlines was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Lagos Airport and was subsequently reduced to spares.
  • On 7 October 1981, Douglas C-47A ET-AHR of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond repair at Combolcha Airport, Dessie when the undercarriage collapsed on landing. The aircraft was destroyed in December 1981 when a Mil Mi-24 helicopter crashed into it.
  • On 27 August 1981, Douglas C-47B ET-AGX of the United Nations Ethiopian Relief and Rehabilitation Commission was written off at Aba Tenna Dejazmach Yilma International Airport when the port undercarriage collapsed on landing.
  • On 7 August 1981, Douglas C-47B CC-CBW of Aerolineas Cordillera crashed near Teniente Vidal Airport, Coyhaique.
  • On 1 August 1981, Douglas C-47B F-BJHC of Hemet Exploration was shot down by a surface to air missile when it was mistaken for a hostile aircraft whilst following instructions from ATC. All six people on board were killed. The aircraft crashed near Beira. The Mozambique authorities initially tried to cover up their mistake, merely posting the aircraft as "missing". It was admitted later that the aircraft had been shot down.
  • On 25 July 1981, Douglas C-53D HK-772 of Transamazonica crashed on approach to Caruru Airport, Caruru while trying to perform an emergency landing with the starboard engine shut down. Four of the nine people on board were killed.
  • On 1 July 1981, Douglas R4D N111ST of United Aircraft Services crashed shortly after take-off from Pilot Point Airport while on a flight to Anchorage International Airport, following the failure of the port engine. All three people on board were killed. The aircraft was on a cargo flight laden with fish.
  • On 25 June 1981, Douglas C-47 FAC-1129 of SATENA was damaged beyond repair in an accident. The aircraft was subsequently withdrawn from use and stored at La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio.
  • On 24 June 1981, Douglas DC-3 N18949 of Nathaniel Hawthorne College crashed shortly after take-off from Hawthorne-Feather Airpark, Deering, New Hampshire while on a ferry flight to Melbourne International Airport, Florida. The pilot, who was seriously injured in the crash, had attempted to take-off with insufficient airspeed for flight.
  • On 17 June 1981, Douglas C-47A HK-1078 of Taxi Aéreo El Venado ditched into a lake near Miraflores Airport following an overshoot with an engine shut down. Two of the twelve people on board were killed.
  • On 9 May 1981, Douglas C-47 N60705 of Sky Train Air crashed at Vicente Guerrero.
  • On 28 April 1981, Douglas C-47A PK-OBK of Airfast Indonesia crashed on approach to Simpang Tiga Airport, Pekanbaru, on a non-scheduled passenger flight. Nine of the 17 people on board were killed.
  • On 21 April 1981, Douglas C-53 F-BJBY of Hemet Exploration crashed into the Mediterranean Sea 15 nautical miles (28 km) off Puerto de Andraitx, Mallorca while on an international non-scheduled passenger flight from Oran Es Sénia Airport, Algeria to Toulouse-Blagnac Airport, France. All four people on board were killed.
  • On 6 April 1981, Douglas C-47A CP-1470 of Urcupina crashed at Laguna Soliz killing all seven people on board.
  • On 2 April 1981, Douglas C-47A N258M of Sky Train Air was written off in an accident while taxying at General Heriberto Jara International Airport, Veracruz..
  • On 16 March 1981, Douglas C-47A C-FIRW of Air Inuit was damaged beyond repair when it broke through the frozen surface of Lac Bienville whilst taxying for take-off on a cargo flight.
  • On 2 March 1981, Douglas C-47B HK-2497 of LANSA was substantially damaged in a forced landing at Anapoima following a double engine failure. The aircraft was later repaired and returned to service, only to be written off in an accident at La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio on 30 March 1996.
  • On 28 January 1981, Douglas C-47A PP-ZNU of Sudene crashed at Petrolina Airport.
  • On 11 January 1981, Douglas C-47A ET-AGW of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond repair when the port undercarriage collapsed on landing at Bahir Dar Airport.
  • On 27 December 1980, Douglas C-47B N54605 of Visionair International was damaged beyond repair in a storm at Reykjavík Airport.
  • On 18 December 1980, Douglas C-47A R3711 of the Zimbabwe Air Force crashed at Marandellas.
  • On 27 November 1980, Douglas C-47A HK-1221G of the Dirección General de Aduanas (the agency of the Colombian government responsible for Customs) flew into a mountain near Medellín at an altitude of 9,500 feet (2,900 m) on a flight to Enrique Olaya Herrera Airport, Medellín. All 15 people on board were killed.
  • On 13 November 1980, Douglas DC-3 FAC-1311 of SATENA was damaged beyond repair at Subchoque.
  • On 3 November 1980, Douglas C-47B TG-BAC of Aero Express crashed near Flores killing all seven people on board.
  • On 3 October 1980, Douglas DC-3 ECT-025, a former Ejército del Aire aircraft, disappeared on a flight from Cuatro Vientos Airport, Madrid to Perpignan - Rivesaltes Airport, France. The aircraft had been purchased by Kirfiss Aviation and was on the first stage of a ferry to Germany where it was destined for a museum. The aircraft is presumed to have crashed into the Mediterranean Sea, killing both crew.
  • On 12 September 1980, Douglas DC-3A N75KW of Florida Commuter Airlines crashed into the sea 6.4 nautical miles (11.9 km) off West End, Grand Bahama, killing all 34 people on board. The aircraft was on an international non-scheduled passenger flight from Palm Beach International Airport, United States to Grand Bahama International Airport. Although the cause of the accident was never determined, it is known that the aircraft flew into a thunderstorm and that there were pre-existing deficiencies with the pitot tube and static system on the aircraft. Florida Commuter Airlines was criticized for its poor maintenance regime.
  • On 10 September 1980, Douglas C-47 HK-329 of Aeronorte Colombia crashed at Puerto Olaya after a wing separated in flight, killing all three people on board. The aircraft was on a cargo flight from Ernesto Cortissoz International Airport, Barranquilla to El Dorado International Airport, Bogotá.
  • On 27 August 1980, Douglas C-47B FAP2016 of TAM - Transporte Aéreo Militar crashed on approach to Silvio Pettirossi International Airport, Asunción. One person was killed. The aircraft was on a flight to Juan de Ayolas Airport when an engine failed shortly after take-off and the decision was made to land back at Asunción.
  • On 23 August 1980, Douglas C-47 HJ235 of the Indian Air Force crashed at Guwahati Airport, killing all nine people on board.
  • On 1 August 1980, Douglas R4D N45864 crashed at New Smyrna Beach, Florida shortly after take-off from New Smyrna Beach Municipal Airport on a ferry flight to Queen Beatrix International Airport, Aruba. The unqualified pilot, who had been drinking, was killed.
  • On 12 July 1980, a Douglas C-47 crashed on approach to Toussaint Louverture International Airport, killing all three people on board. The aircraft was being used illegally to transport marijuana.
  • On 2 July 1980, a Douglas C-47 of the Royal Thai Navy crashed into the Gulf of Thailand. Two of the 21 people on board were killed.
  • On 28 May 1980, Douglas C-47 HR-SAC of SAHSA crashed on approach to Útila Airport when the landng gear struck a wall.
  • On 23 April 1980, Douglas C-47B N709Z of Florida Preferred Equity crashed near Dania, Florida when it stalled whilst a go-around was performed. The aircraft was on a private passenger flight from South Bimini Airport, Bahamas, to Fort Lauderdale International Airport, Florida. One of the eight people on board was severely injured.
  • On 11 April 1980, Douglas C-47A N64490 crashed on take-off from Athol-Silverwood Airport, Idaho following an engine failure. Both crew and one of the four passengers were killed.
  • On 18 March 1980, Douglas C-47B ET-AGM of Ethiopian Airlines crashed whilst on a single-engined approach to Bole International Airport, Addis Ababa. The aircraft was on a training flight.
  • On 13 March 1980, Douglas C-47B CP-1243 of Aerolineas La Paz crashed at Beni shortly after take-off from Beni Airport. The aircraft was on a cargo flight to San Borja Airport, Bolivia.
  • On 1 March 1980, a Douglas C-47 of the Fuerza Aérea Guatemalteca was damaged beyond repair near La Aurora International Airport.
  • On 24 January 1980, Douglas C-53D HK-2214 of Aerotal Colombia crashed at El Dorado International Airport, Bogotá after an inflight engine failure following which the propellor on the operating engine was feathered. The aircraft was on a test flight. All four on board were killed.
  • On 18 January 1980, Douglas C-47A L2-13/96 of 603 Squadron, Royal Thai Air Force crashed into the sea off Si Racha. All five people on board were killed.
  • On 27 December 1979, Douglas C-47 313 of the Fuerza Aérea Hondureña crashed at Puerto Lempira whilst on a military flight. Both crew were killed and some of the passengers were injured.
  • On 13 November 1979, Douglas C-47A PT-KVT of Consultoria Tecnica Operacional de Aviacao crashed 5 nautical miles (9.3 km) north of Cascavel.
  • On 10 November 1979, Douglas C-47B ST-AHH of the National Agriculture Organisation crashed at Kadugli Airport and was destroyed by the subsequent fire.
  • On 30 October 1979, Douglas C-47B N99663 of Frontier Flying Service was written off in a landing accident at Bettles Airport, Alaska. The aircraft struck three parked aircraft. It was on a cargo flight from Fairbanks International Airport, Alaska, to Ambler Airport, Alaska via Bettles. All four aircraft were substantially damaged.
  • On 21 September 1979, Douglas C-47A ET-AGU of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at Barentu Airport.
  • On 31 August 1979, Douglas DC-3 HI-237 of Alas del Caribe was damaged beyond repair by Hurricane David at an airport in Santo Domingo.
  • On 12 June 1979, Douglas DC-3D N427W of Bradley Aviation crashed shortly after take-off from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport after take-off was attempted at too low an airspeed. Both crew were killed. The pilot did not have a rating to fly the DC-3 and the aircraft did not have a certificate of airworthiness.
  • On 11 June 1979, Douglas C-47A N148Z of the United States Forest Service was damaged beyond repair when an engine caught fire in flight and then fell off. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight that had departed from Grangeville County Airport. Although a forced landing was made in the Selway River some 48 nautical miles (89 km) north east of Elk City, Idaho, ten of the twelve people on board were killed.
  • On 7 May 1979, Douglas DC-3 TG-SAB of TAPSA was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Flores International Airport, Flores-Santa Elena when it departed the runway and collided with a car. The aircraft was subsequently repaired and returned to service.
  • On 20 April 1979, Douglas C-47A ET-AGU of Ethiopian Airlines was substantially damaged in a landing accident at Oborso Airport. The aircraft was repaired and returned to service.
  • On 8 April 1979, a Douglas C-47 of the Fuerza Aérea Nicaragua was damaged beyond economic repair at Condega.
  • On 5 April 1979, Douglas C-47A L2-26/02 of the Royal Thai Air Force was hit by a car on the ground at an airfield in Thailand. The aircraft was subsequently written off.
  • On 19 February 1979, Douglas C-47 ET-AFW of Ethiopian Airlines crashed at Barentu Airport after a bomb exploded on board. All five people on board the aircraft were killed.
  • On 28 January 1979, Douglas C-47 ET-AGP of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident at Heycota. Three people were killed.
  • On 10 January 1979, Douglas DC-3A N9025R of Waggoner Aircraft was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Southbay Airport, Florida. The aircraft nosed over when it landed on soft ground.
  • Douglas C-47A F-BCYX of Trans Europe Air was reported to have been damaged beyond repair at Toulouse-Blagnac Airport sometime during 1978.
  • On 14 December 1978, Douglas C-47A N4996E was written off in a landing in a sugar cane field at Battle Creek, Florida whilst being used to smuggle marijuana. The pilot was not qualified to fly the aircraft and mismanaged the fuel system. both crew were killed.
  • On 11 December 1978, Douglas C-49J N133AC of Aircraft Sales and Leasing crashed near Port Mayaca, Florida due to fuel exhaustion. The aircraft was being used to smuggle marijuana at the time and both crew were killed.
  • On 5 December 1978, Douglas C-53 N25656 of Caribe Air Sales crashed shortly after take-off from Sebring Airport, Florida and was destroyed by fire. The gust locks had not been removed before flight and the aircraft was overloaded. All three people on board were killed.
  • On 2 December 1978, Douglas C-47A N41447 of SMB Stage Line crashed short of the runway at Des Moines International Airport, Idaho whilst on a cargo flight from Chicago, Illinois. Airframe icing was a factor in the accident.
  • On 21 November 1978, Douglas C-47A HK-1393 of Taxi Aéreo El Venado crashed into Mount Judio at an altitude of 11,200 feet (3,400 m) whilst on a domestic scheduled passenger flight from Camilo Daza International Airport to Santiago Pérez Quiroz Airport. All 28 people on board were killed.
  • On 14 November 1978, Douglas C-47A 4W-ABY of Yemen Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Mareb Airport.
  • On 25 October 1978, Douglas C-47A ET-AGQ of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Degahbur Airport. Although the aircraft was on a cargo flight, it was carrying nine passengers and four crew, all of whom survived.
  • On 15 October 1978, Douglas C-47A ET-AGK of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Soddu Airport following a hydraulic system failure. The aircraft was on a domestic scheduled passenger flight. All 32 people on board survived. The aircraft was later used as an instructional airframe. As of July 2010, the aircraft is reported to be stored at Addis Ababa.
  • On 7 October 1978, Douglas C-47A PT-KVU of RICO Taxi Aéreo was damaged beyond economic repair when it overran the runway on landing at Carlos Prates Airport, Belo Horizonte. All 19 people on board survived.
  • On 5 October 1978, Douglas C-47A PK-NDI of Merpati Nusantara Airlines caught fire whilst parked at Ngurah Rai International Airport, Bali and was destroyed.
  • On 3 October 1978, Douglas C-47A DO-10 of the Suomen Ilmavoimat crashed into Lake Juuruvesi when attempting to return to Kuopio Airport. The aircraft was on a military flight to Helsinki Airport when an engine failed shortly after take-off and the decision was made to return to Kuopio.
  • On 1 October 1978, Douglas R4D-6 N47Z of Evergreen Air ditched off Fort Walton Beach, Florida following a failure of the electrical system whilst on a flight from Miami International Airport to an unnamed airport in San Juan, Puerto Rico. One of the four people on board was killed.
  • On 24 September 1978, Douglas C-47B G-BFPU was damaged beyond repair in following a forced landing 6.9 nautical miles (12.8 km) north east of Karima following problems with both engines. Following a successful belly landing, the aircraft was destroyed by the subsequent fire.
  • On 21 September 1978, Douglas DC-3 N407D of Argosy Airlines crashed into the Caribbean Sea whilst on a ferry flight from Fort Lauderdale International Airport to José Martí International Airport, Havana. All four people on board were killed. The aircraft disappeared off radar screens at 12:43 local time (17:43 UTC). A search was initiated, which USCGC Steadfast coordinated, but was called off on 24 September without any trace of N407D being found.
  • On 18 September 1978, Douglas C-47A C-FCRW of Kenn Borek Air was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Komakuk Airport, Northwest Territories.
  • On 17 August 1978, Douglas C-47B G-AMSM of Skyways Cargo Airline was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at Lydd (Ferryfield) Airport. The nose section of this aircraft is preserved at Brenzett Aeronautical Museum, Kent.
  • On 28 July 1978, Douglas C-47B F-BIEE crashed into the Mediterranean off Italy whilst on an illegal flight from France to an unknown African destination.
  • On 26 July 1978, Douglas DC-3 TG-AFA of Aviateca overran the runway at Flores International Airport following a birdstrike on take-off and was reported to have been damaged beyond economic repair. The aircraft was later repaired and returned to service.
  • On 20 July 1978, Douglas C-47A TG-PAW of Aero Express was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Lake Peten Itza whilst on a flight from Dos Lagunas Airport to Flores International Airport.
  • On 9 July 1978, Douglas C-47A N45873 was damaged beyond repair in a take-off accident at Richmond International Airport. All 42 people on board survived. The aircraft was on a local flight dropping parachutists. The cause of the accident was a jam in the elevator control system.
  • On 30 May 1978, Douglas C-47B TG-LAM of Oneida crashed near Volcán Santo Tomás.
  • On 19 May 1978, Douglas C-47A VT-DEU of the India Civil Aviation Department crashed at Badkhalsa following a failure of the port engine. All eight people on board were killed.
  • On 23 March 1978, Douglas C-47A N1546A of Dominicana Air Services ditched off Grand Turk following an onboard fire. One of the three crew was killed.
  • On 15 March 1978, Douglas C-47 L2/48/18/100937 of the Royal Thai Air Force was damaged beyond repair in an accident at Don Nok AFB. The port engine failed shortly after take-off and an emergency landing was being attempted.
  • On 21 February 1978, Douglas DC-3 FAC-668 of SATENA crashed at an unknown location in Columbia.
  • On 10 February 1978, Douglas C-47A CX-BJH of TAMU crashed shortly after take-off from Artigas Airport on a domestic scheduled passenger flight to Carrasco International Airport, Montevideo. All 44 people on board were killed, making this the second-worst involving a DC-3 and the worst aviation accident in Uruguay at the time.
  • On 8 February 1978, Douglas C-49J N189UM of Aero Service Corporation was damaged beyond repair in a landing accident at Tamanrasset Airport.
  • On 28 January 1978, Douglas C-47 TT-EAB of Air Tchad was reportedly shot down by rebels near Tibesti. The damaged aircraft apparently landed at N'Djamena International Airport where it was to be seen in 1980, but has since been scrapped.
  • On 27 January 1978, Douglas DC-3D HK-1351 of SADELCA crashed into a mountain at Cerro Granada, Caquetá, killing all twelve people on board. The altitude of the crash site is 6,800 feet (2,100 m), and the mountain was obscured by clouds at the time. The aircraft was on a scheduled passenger flight.
  • On 2 January 1978, Douglas DC-3 N15598 of Aero Virgin Islands ditched in the sea 1,000 feet (300 m) off San Juan. The aircraft was on an international scheduled passenger flight from Saint Thomas Airport, United States Virgin Islands to San Juan. All five people on board survived. The cause of the accident was that the pilot mismanaged the fuel system, running the starboard tanks dry when there was fuel available in the port tanks.
  • On 13 December 1977, Douglas C-53 N51071 of National Jet Services crashed on take-off from Evansville Regional Airport, Indiana whilst on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight to Nashville Metropolitan Airport, Tennessee. All 29 people on board were killed. The cause of the accident was that the gust locks had not been removed and the aircraft was improperly loaded, resulting in an aft centre of gravity.
  • On 20 November 1977, Douglas C-47B FAC-1127 of SATENA crashed in Colombia.
  • On 20 November 1977, Douglas C-47A FAC-1120 of SATENA crashed at Llanos del Yori, Columbia.
  • On 28 October 1977, a Douglas DC-3 of Air Vietnam was hijacked to U-Tapao International Airport where the four hijackers surrendered. Two people on board the aircraft were killed in the hijacking. The aircraft was on a domestic flight from Tan Son Nhat International Airport, Ho Chi Minh City to Phu Quoc Airport, Duong Dong.
  • On 23 October 1977, Douglas C-47 C-FSAW of Geoterrex flew into a mountain near Manidar whilst on a survey flight. All three crew were killed.
  • On 2 October 1977, Douglas C-47A N65121 was shot down by the Fuerza Aérea Colombiana near Villavicencio whilst being used on a drug‑smuggling flight. Both crew were killed.
  • On 30 September 1977, Douglas C-47A TG-AKA of Aviateca was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Flores International Airport, Santa Elena. One of the three crew members was killed.
  • On 21 September 1977, Douglas C-47 N723A of NJ Airlines crashed at Narsarsuaq Airport.
  • On 14 August 1977, Douglas C-47A ET-AAP of Ethiopian Airlines was reportedly shot down at Massawa.
  • On 12 August 1977, Douglas C-53D ET-AGR of the United Nations' Ethiopian Relief and Rehabilitation Commission was destroyed in an air raid at Jijiga Airport.
  • On 25 July 1977, Douglas C-47 FAH-301 of the Fuerza Aérea Hondureña crashed shortly after take-off from Yoro Airport due to the failure of the port engine. The aircraft was on a military flight to Toncontín International Airport, Tegucigalpa. Twenty-five of the 40 people on board were killed.
  • On 20 July 1977, Douglas R4D-1 ET-ABF of Ethiopian Airlines flew into a mountain near Tubo Milkie whilst on a domestic cargo flight from Tippi Airport to Jimma Airport. All five people on board were killed.
  • On 19 July 1977, Douglas C-47A HK-166 of Lineas Aéreas Orientales crashed on approach to Fabio Alberto León Airport, Mitú. All ten people on board survived.
  • On 18 July 1977, Douglas DC-3A N459 crashed at Sheridan, Wyoming whilst engaged in spraying. Both crew were killed and the aircraft was destroyed by fire.
  • On 27 June 1977, Douglas C-47D L2-11/96/45941 of the Royal Thai Air Force crashed in the Lamlukka District when on a flight from Udorn AFB to Don Muang AFB.
  • On 21 June 1977, a Douglas C-47 of the Royal Thai Air Force crashed on take-off from Don Muang AFB, Bangkok. Five of the twelve people on board were killed when the aircraft collided with a Fairchild C-123 Provider.
  • On 17 June 1977, Douglas C-47 HK-1511 of Taxi Aéreo Nacional was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident at Condonto Airport.
  • On 12 June 1977, Douglas C-47A ET-AAP of Ethiopian Airlines was reported to have been damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Kabri Dar Airport, Kebri Dahar when the port undercarriage collapsed.
  • On 12 June 1977, Douglas DC-3A N33649 was written off in a forced landing at Vero Beach, Florida whilst being used to smuggle drugs.
  • On 10 June 1977, Douglas C-47 5U-AAJ of Air Niger was written off in a forced landing at Founkoueye following an engine failure. The aircraft was on a scheduled passenger flight which had departed from Tahoua Airport. All 21 people on board survived.
  • On 30 May 1977, Douglas C-47A R3702 of No. 3 Squadron Rhodesian Air Force was hit by a RPG-7 fired by ZANLA guerillas during take-off from Mapai. One person was killed.
  • On 25 May 1977, Douglas C-47 IJ297 of the Indian Air Force was written off in an accident.
  • On 12 May 1977, Douglas R4D-1 C-FBKV of Patricia Air Services was written off in an accident at Pickle Lake Airport, Ontario. One person was killed.
  • On 25 April 1977, a Douglas DC-3 of Ethiopian Airlines was hijacked on a flight from Alula Aba Airport, Mek'ele to Gondar Airport. Three people were killed, and the hijackers were overpowered.
  • On 16 April 1977, Douglas C-47A B-247 of Far Eastern Air Transport was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Tainan Airport.
  • On 11 April 1977, Douglas C-47B C-FXXT of Superior Airways was damaged beyond economic repair in an aborted take-off at Wunnummin Lake Airport.
  • On 10 April1977, Douglas DC-3 HK-556 of Taxi Aéreo El Venado flew into Rio Guape at an altitude of 7,200 feet (2,200 m). The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from La Vanguardia Airport, Villavicencio to El Dorado International Airport, Bogotá. The wreckage was not discovered for 35 days. All 35 people on board were killed.
  • On 5 April1977, Douglas C-47A VT-EEL of the National Remote Sensing Agency flew into a hill in the Velikonda Range at Edavlli, killing all ten people on board. The aircraft was on a survey flight.
  • On 31 March 1977, the pilot of a Swiftair flight shot and killed seven passengers whilst the aircraft was in flight. The Douglas DC-3 suffered minor damage. It was repaired and returned to service.
  • On 28 March 1977, Douglas C-47A N57131 of Emery Worldwide was destroyed by fire following a taxiing accident at O'Hare International Airport, Chicago, Illinois. The aircraft was due to operate a cargo flight.
  • On 25 March 1977, Douglas C-53 N692A of Island Traders was damaged beyond economic repair in a heavy landing at Cyril E. King Airport, Charlotte Amalie.
  • On 1 March 1977, Douglas C-47A 7O-ABF of Alyemda crashed into the Red Sea shortly after take-off from Aden International Airport. The aircraft was on a scheduled passenger flight. All 19 people on board were killed.
  • On 28 February 1977, Douglas C-47A C-FNAR of Survair crashed near Saglouc, Quebec in white-out conditions. Four of the ten people on board were killed.
  • On 28 February 1977, Douglas C-47A C-FIQR of Kenn Borek Air crashed near Saglone, Quebec.
  • On 17 February 1977, Douglas C-47B FAC-1125 of SATENA was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at Fabio Alberto León Bentley Airport, Mitú. All 28 people on board survived.
  • On 14 February 1977, Douglas C-47A PK-WWK of National Air Charter was damaged beyond economic repair. As of 2000, the aircraft was reported to still be in existence.
  • On 7 February 1977, Douglas C-47A PK-NDH of Merpati Nusantara Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at Tanjung Santan Airport.
  • On 15 January 1977, Douglas DC-3 N73KW of Air Sunshine crashed shortly after take-off from Miami International Airport, Florida on a domestic scheduled passenger flight to Key West International Airport, Florida. All 33 people on board survived.
  • On 6 January 1977, Douglas C-47B R7034 of No. 3 Squadron, Royal Rhodesian Air Force collided with electricity poles shortly after take-off from Buffalo Range Airport and crashed, killing all three crew.
  • On 6 January 1977, Douglas C-47A CP-728 of Transportes Aéreos Itenez was damaged beyond economic repair in a belly landing at La Senda. The aircraft was on a domestic cargo flight from Viru Viru International Airport, Santa Cruz de la Sierra to Teniente Jorge Henrich Arauz Airport, Trinidad when the pilot decided to return to Viru Viru following a problem with the port engine. The starboard engine also malfunctioned and it was then impossible to maintain height despite cargo being jettisoned. All four people on board survived.
  • During 1976, Douglas C-49J C-FHPM of Atlantic Central Airlines was reported to have been damaged beyond economic repair at Saint John Airport, New Brunswick.
  • On 14 December 1976, Douglas C-47B ET-AEJ of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair when the undercarriage collapsed on landing at Oborso Airport. The aircraft was on a scheduled passenger flight. All eight people on board survived.
  • On 10 December 1976, Douglas C-47A C-FIAX of Austin Airways crashed on take-off from Chisabisi Airport. All eight people on board survived.
  • On 30 November 1976, Douglas C-117B N2010 of the United States Department of Agriculture crashed into a mountain at Victoria whilst on a flight dispersing sterile screw-worms.
  • On 25 November 1976, Douglas C-47 CP-755 of Aerolineas La Paz was damaged beyond economic repair in a landing accident at El Alto International Airport, La Paz. The aircraft was on a cargo flight, all four people on board survived.
  • On 12 November 1976, Douglas C-47 BJ922 of the Indian Air Force was damaged beyond economic repair.
  • On 5 November 1976, Douglas DC-3 HP-671 of Inair Panama disappeared on a flight from Hato International Airport, Willemstad to Mais Gate Airport, Port-au-Prince. Both crew were killed.
  • On 25 October 1976, Douglas C-47 HK-149 of Taxi Aéreo El Venado crashed on approach to El Alcaraván Airport, Yopal. The aircraft was on a domestic scheduled passenger flight. Shortly after take-off, the port engine failed and the decision was made to return to El Alcaraván. All 36 people on board were killed.
  • In September 1976, Douglas C-53 T.3-57 of the Ejército del Aire was involved in an accident at Cuatro Vientos AFB, Madrid and subsequently withdrawn from use.
  • On 23 September 1976, Douglas C-47A L2-40/15 of the Royal Thai Air Force was damaged beyond economic repair in a take-off accident at Sakon Nakhon Airport.
  • On 7 September 1976, Douglas C-47 C-GKFC of Kelowna Flightcraft Air Charter was destroyed by fire after an emergency landing near Brockett, British Columbia. All 26 people on board escaped. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight from Vernon Airport, Alberta to Lethbridge Airport, British Columbia.
  • On 14 July 1976, Lisunov Li-2 CCCP-13369 of MAP Kazan APO crashed after takeoff from an unidentified Soviet airfield. The wrong type of fuel had been tanked and the aircraft was also overloaded.
  • On 5 July 1976, a Douglas C-47 of the Tatmadaw Lei crashed near Daiku. All 17 people on board were killed.
  • On 11 June 1976, Douglas C-47A PP-AJC of RICO Taxi Aéreo was written off at Rio Manana. Three people were killed.
  • On 6 June 1976, Lisunov Li-2 CCCP-13345 of MAP Zhukovsky crashed into the Kama River following an engine failure. The aircraft hit telephone lines and then crashed. It was on a flight from Moscow to Tyumen.
  • On 31 May 1976, Douglas C-47B ET-ADC of Ethiopian Airlines was destroyed by fire after an explosion whilst taxiing at Massawa Airport.
  • On 20 May 1976, Douglas C-47 CF-FKZ of Survair was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident at Asbestos Hill Airport, Quebec.
  • On 23 April 1976, Douglas C-47A ET-AAS of Ethiopian Airlines was damaged beyond economic repair at Massawa Airport.
  • On 2 April 1976, Douglas DC-3 FAC-676 of SATENA crashed on approach to Gustavo Artunduaga Paredes Airport, Florencia. The aircraft was on a flight from Tres de Mayo Airport, Puerto Asís. Five of the 16 people on board were killed.
  • On 24 March 1976, Douglas C-47A XW-TAF and C-47Bs XW-TDF and XW-TDR or Royal Air Lao were damaged beyond economic repair in a storm at Wattay International Airport, Vientiane.
  • On 16 February 1976, Douglas C-47A TT-LAG of the Force Aérienne Tchadienne was damaged beyond economic repair in an accident at Faya-Largeau Airport.
  • On 29 January 1976, Douglas C-47D T.3-32 of the Ejército del Aire was involved in an accident and subsequently withdrawn from use.
  • On 18 January 1976, Douglas C-47 CP-573 of Frigorifico Maniqui crashed near Capitán Germán Quiroga Guardia Airport, San Borja following a failure of the starboard engine. The aircraft was on a domestic non-scheduled passenger flight. Seven of the ten people on board were killed.
  • On 25 December 1974, Douglas C-47B A65-104 of the Royal Australian Air Force was damaged at RAAF Base Darwin during Cyclone Tracy and subsequently written off. At Darwin Airport (which shares its runway with the RAAF base), Douglas C-47B PK-RDB of Seulawah Air Services was also damaged beyond repair. The wings and tail of A65-104; and the rear fuselage and tail of PK-RDB; are now held in storage at the Australian Aviation Heritage Centre in Darwin.
  • On 15 December 1974, Douglas C-50 XW-TFI of Khemara Air crashed at Takéo.
  • On 10 April 1974, Douglas C-47B A65-111 of the Royal Australian Air Force was destroyed by fire on the ground at RAAF Base Laverton, where it had been in storage since October 1972 pending its disposal. The cockpit was salvaged and in 1976 was sold to a private individual who restored it over a period of 13 years. The cockpit is now permanently mounted on a trailer and is displayed at air shows in Australia by its owner.

Specifications (DC-3A)

General characteristics

Crew: two
Capacity: 21–32 passengers
Length: 64 ft 8 in (19.7 m)
Wingspan: 95 ft 2 in (29.0 m)
Height: 16 ft 11 in (5.16 m)
Wing area: 987 sq ft (91.7 m2)
Airfoil: NACA2215 / NACA2206
Empty weight: 16,865 lb (7,650 kg)
Gross weight: 25,199 lb (11,430 kg)
Fuel capacity: 822 gal. (3736 l)
Powerplant: 2 × Wright R-1820 Cyclone 9-cyl. air-cooled radial piston engine, 1,100 hp (820 kW) each
Powerplant: 2 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830-S1C3G Twin Wasp 14-cyl. air-cooled two row radial piston engine, 1,200 hp (890 kW) each
Propellers: 3-bladed Hamilton Standard 23E50 series, 11.5 ft (3.5 m) diameter

Performance

Maximum speed: 200 kn; 370 km/h (230 mph) at 8,500 ft (2,590 m)
Cruise speed: 180 kn; 333 km/h (207 mph)
Stall speed: 58.2 kn (67 mph; 108 km/h)
Service ceiling: 23,200 ft (7,100 m)
Rate of climb: 1,130 ft/min (5.7 m/s)
Wing loading: 25.5 lb/sq ft (125 kg/m2)
Power/mass: 0.0952 hp/lb (156.5 W/kg)

Notable appearances in media

The chief character of the 1965 novel High Citadel by Desmond Bagley is an alcoholic former Korean War fighter pilot who flies a Douglas DC-3 for a small airline in a fictional Andean country in South America. He is forced at gunpoint by his co-pilot—a Communist agent—to crash-land the DC-3 at a remote abandoned mine in the Andes so that Communists planning a coup can capture and kill a politician travelling as a passenger.

A DC-3A of Central Airlines appears in the 1954 film Strategic Air Command as the transport that conveys a security check team into Carswell AFB, Texas.

An episode of The Twilight Zone entitled "The Arrival" features a DC-3 on Flight 107, which arrives at its destination with no one on board. It originally aired 22 September 1961.

A DC-3 starred in the 1982 British television series Airline. The aircraft used to depict the DC-3 of the fictional Ruskin Air Services was also used in the television series Tenko and Band of Brothers.

In the 1989 comedy film Major League, the hard-luck Cleveland Indians baseball team is "upgraded" to a DC-3 for their transportation to away games.

In the 1994 film Richie Rich, the Rich family own and pilot a DC-3, named "Billion Dollar One", which crashes in the Atlantic due to a bomb on board.

The DC-3 features in a chase scene in the 2008 James Bond film Quantum of Solace.

The 2012 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television series Arctic Air features a Yellowknife-based airline that relies on DC-3s.

Last updated January 24, 2016  
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Douglas DC-3".
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