- Aircraft History, Specification and Information -
Cessna 350 Corvalis
Cessna 350 Corvalis - LC42-550FG - N1019K
2008 Cessna 350 Corvalis (Model LC42-550FG)
N1019K (sn 421004)
Photo taken July 28, 2010 @ Fond du Lac Airport, WI - (FLD / KFLD)
Photo © Marcel Siegenthaler

The Cessna 350 Corvalis is a composite construction, single-engine, normally-aspirated, fixed-gear, low-wing general aviation aircraft built by Cessna Aircraft.

The aircraft was formerly called the Columbia 350 when it was built by Columbia Aircraft.

Development

Columbia 300
Developed as the Model LC40-550FG (for Lancair Certified, Model 40, Continental 550 engine, Fixed Gear) and marketed under the name Columbia 300, the aircraft was certified on September 18, 1998.

The 300 is powered by a Teledyne Continental Model IO-550-N engine of 310 horsepower (230 kW) at 2700 rpm. The aircraft's maximum take-off weight is 3400 lbs (1542 kg) and the maximum landing weight is 3230 lbs (1465 kg).

The 300 has a certified airframe life of 25200 flight hours.

Columbia 350
The Columbia 300 was upgraded with a glass cockpit and other improvements developed for the turbocharged Columbia 400. It was certified on March 30, 2003 as the Model LC42-550FG (for Lancair Certified, Model 42, Continental 550 engine, Fixed Gear) and marketed as the Columbia 350.

Like the 300, the 350 is powered by a Teledyne Continental IO-550-N powerplant producing 310 horsepower (230 kW) at 2700 rpm. The 350 has the same take-off and landing weights as the 300; maximum take-off weight is 3400 lbs (1542 kg) and the maximum landing weight is 3230 lbs (1465 kg).

Like the 300 and 400, the 350 has a certified airframe life of 25200 flight hours.

Initially sold simply as the Cessna 350, the aircraft was given the marketing name Corvalis by Cessna on 14 January 2009. The name is a derivation of the town of Corvallis, Oregon which is west of the Bend, Oregon location of the Cessna plant that built the aircraft, prior to closing the plant and relocating production to Independence, Kansas in 2009.

In April 2009 Cessna announced that it would close the Bend, Oregon factory where the Cessna 350 was produced and move production to Independence, Kansas, with the composite construction moved to Mexico. The production line was restarted in October, 2009 in the Cessna Independence paint facility, at a rate of one aircraft per six months initially. This was to allow the new workers, plus the 30 employees transferred from Bend, to gain experience and also allow Cessna the opportunity to retail its unsold inventory of Cessna 350s and 400s. The company anticipates moving the 350/400 production into a permanent facility by the end of 2009.

Specifications (Cessna 350)

General characteristics
Crew: 1 pilot
Capacity: 3 passengers
Length: 25 ft 2 in (7.67 m)
Wingspan: 36 ft 1 in (11.0 m)
Height: 9 ft 0 in (2.74 m)
Wing area: 141 ft² (13.1 m²)
Empty weight: 2,300 lb (1,000 kg)
Max takeoff weight: 3,400 lb (1,500 kg)
Powerplant: 1× Teledyne Continental Motors (TCM) IO-550-N flat-6 engine, 310 hp (230 kW)

Performance
Maximum speed: 191 knots (220 mph, 354 km/h)
Range: 1,496 mi (1,300 nm, 2,038 km)
Service ceiling: 18,000 ft (5,486 m)
Rate of climb: 1,500 ft/min (7.6 m/s)
Wing loading: 25.5 lb/ft² (125 kg/m²)
Power/mass: 0.091 hp/lb (150 W/kg)

Last updated September 06, 2010
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Cessna 350".
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